A State by State Guide to Investment Incentives and Capital Formation in the United States

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Kluwer Law International, 2004 - Law - 433 pages
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In today¿s world of globalization, The United States generally is considered by foreign investors around the world to be the safest and most profitable location to invest their funds and from where to operate a headquarters or manufacturing site. After more than a decade of prosperity and a strong currency coupled with the traditional political stability, The United States has emerged as a net importer of capital For The first time in post World War II history. Increasing profit margins for multinationals, relatively low interest rates, incredible stock exchange prices and volume, a reduced level of inflation and record consumer spending resulting from sophisticated demands of the baby boomer age, As well as an accelerated rate of immigrant arrivals, all have inspired new private investment from abroad, now surpassing the $5 trillion mark in direct and indirect investment. Surveys consistently show that foreign business persons, like their American counterparts, seek locations from which to manufacture, assemble, or service their products where the tax or investment incentives are most attractive. This fact is reflected in the operations of the Fortune 500 in the United States where 80% of privately invested assets are located in the five states of New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Illinois and California, all of which are leaders in providing trade and investment concessions to businesses. Investment incentives consist of a variety of inducements ranging from tax credits and cash grants and tax exemptions or reductions to accelerated depreciation, loan subsidies and property tax, sales tax and customs duty exclusions or reductions, As well as foreign trade and enterprise zone availability. Unlike the array of incentives offered by foreign countries, The charts reflect that most of the states rely on property tax concessions, loan subsidy financing, development project rewards, low or no sales taxes and foreign trade zone availability. As in the case of Part I relating to State Investment Incentives, Part II of the U.S. State by State Guide to Investment Incentives and Capital Formation covering the steps required to organize an entity in the United States reflect great similarity in incorporation in contrast with enterprises wishing to operate abroad. Completely updated for this second edition, Walter and Dorothy Diamond¿s Guide presents the reader with a clear picture of all of the differing rules and regulations between the states that govern investors. It¿s clear, concise, user friendly, and invaluable.
 

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Contents

Table 1
1
Table 3
63
Table 4
79
Florida
151
Idaho
169
Illinois
175
Indiana
181
Iowa
189
New Mexico
295
New York
303
North Carolina
311
North Dakota
317
Ohio
323
Oklahoma
329
Oregon
337
Pennsylvania
343

Kansas
195
Kentucky
201
Louisiana
209
Maine
215
Maryland
221
Massachusetts
231
Michigan
237
Minnesota
243
Mississippi
249
Missouri
257
Montana
263
Nebraska
269
Nevada
277
New Hampshire
285
New Jersey
291
Rhode Island
351
South Carolina
357
South Dakota
365
Tennessee
371
Texas
377
Utah
383
Vermont
391
Virginia
397
Washington
403
West Virginia
409
Wisconsin
417
Wyoming
423
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico
429
About the Authors
433
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