A Student's History of England: 1509-1689

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1891 - Great Britain
 

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Page 534 - May it please your majesty, I have neither eyes to see, nor tongue to speak in this place, but as the House is pleased to direct me...
Page 416 - THE body of our Lord Jesus Christ, which was given for thee, preserve thy body and soul unto everlasting life ! Take and eat this in remembrance that Christ died for thee ; and feed on him in thy heart by faith with thanksgiving.
Page 544 - I cannot praise a fugitive and cloistered virtue, unexercised and unbreathed, that never sallies out and sees her adversary, but slinks out of the race, where that immortal garland is to be run for not without dust and heat.
Page 470 - Of law there can be no less acknowledged, than that her seat is the bosom of God, her voice the harmony of the world ; all things in heaven and earth do her homage, the very least as feeling her care, and the greatest as not exempted from her power...
Page 629 - With lust and violence the house of God? In courts and palaces he also reigns And in luxurious cities, where the noise Of riot ascends above their loftiest towers, And injury and outrage : and when night Darkens the streets, then wander forth the sons Of Belial, flown with insolence and wine.
Page 451 - ... ere one year and a half they were brought to such wretchedness, as that any stony heart would have rued the same. Out of every corner of the woods and glens they came creeping forth upon their hands, for their legs could not bear them ; they looked like anatomies of death, they spake like ghosts crying out of their graves...
Page 572 - Thy instruments, to depend more upon Thyself. Pardon such as desire to trample upon the dust of a poor worm, for they are Thy People too. And pardon the folly of this short Prayer: — Even for Jesus Christ's sake. And give us a good night, if it be Thy pleasure. Amen.
Page 621 - Pleased with the danger, when the waves went high He sought the storms; but, for a calm unfit, Would steer too nigh the sands to boast his wit.
Page 538 - You must get men of a spirit, and take it not ill what I say — I know you will not — of a spirit that is likely to go on as far as gentlemen will go, or else you will be beaten still.
Page 572 - Lord, though I am a miserable and wretched creature, I am in covenant with Thee through grace. And I may, I will come to thee, for Thy people. Thou hast made me, though very unworthy, a mean instrument to do them some good, and Thee service...

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