A Summer in the Country

Front Cover
Macmillan, May 1, 2003 - Fiction - 320 pages
1 Review
Marcia Willett’s previous novel, A Week in Winter, her first to be published in the United States, received a rousing welcome from readers and reviewers alike. Her new novel, A Summer in the Country, introduces an equally beguiling cast of characters whose lives become intricately entwined at Foxhole, a charming and cozy country house on the wild edges of the Devon moors.

Brigid Foster has inherited Foxhole from her father, and has created two guest cottages, which she rents during the holidays to tourists. Brigid’s delight at welcoming Louise Parry, one of her regular summer visitors, is tempered by the irritating presence of Brigid’s monumentally judgmental mother, Frummie. Having abandoned Foxhole (and Brigid) forty years earlier, Frummie makes no secret of her disdain for the glorious natural splendor of her surroundings, nor of her preference for Brigid’s flightly but fabulous half-sister, Jemima. Jemima, meanwhile, has problems of her own.

When a stranger begins lurking in the isolated byways of the lonely countryside, Brigid turns to her oddly elusive father-in-law for comfort and protection. But both Brigid and Louise Parry are hiding certain essential facts, and each woman’s fragile sense of haven and security is threatened by disclosure. A Summer in the Country is the story of the enduring, but often painful love that exists between mothers and daughters, fathers and sons, and husbands and wives. It describes with exquisite sensitivity and tenderness the precarious journey each of us undertakes as one generation makes way for the next, as each indelible and priceless relationship grows, changes, blossoms, or dies. Marcia Willett writes novels that will last.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
11
Section 3
19
Section 4
29
Section 5
37
Section 6
45
Section 7
53
Section 8
61
Section 24
191
Section 25
201
Section 26
209
Section 27
217
Section 28
225
Section 29
233
Section 30
243
Section 31
251

Section 9
69
Section 10
77
Section 11
85
Section 12
93
Section 13
101
Section 14
107
Section 15
117
Section 16
127
Section 17
135
Section 18
143
Section 19
151
Section 20
157
Section 21
165
Section 22
171
Section 23
181
Section 32
259
Section 33
267
Section 34
275
Section 35
283
Section 36
291
Section 37
299
Section 38
307
Section 39
317
Section 40
325
Section 41
333
Section 42
343
Section 43
351
Section 44
359
Section 45
367
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2003)

Marcia Willett was the youngest of five girls, born in Somerset, in the west country of England. Her family was unconventional and musical, but Marcia chose to train as a ballet dancer. Unfortunately her body did not develop with the classical proportions demanded by the Royal Ballet, so she studied to be a ballet teacher. Her first husband was a naval officer in the submarine service, with whom she had a son, Charles, now married and training to be a clergyman. Her second husband, Rodney, himself a writer and broadcaster, encouraged Marcia to write novels. Although she has published several novels in England, A Week in Winter was her first novel to be published in the United States. A Summer in the Country is the second.

Bibliographic information