A Synopsis of Science Form [sic] the Standpoint of the Nyáya Philosophy: Sanskrit and English, Volume 1

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Orphan Press, 1852 - Nyaya
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Page 85 - ... which contains a little mercury. Part of the mercury which was in the tube now falls down into the cup, leaving a vacant space in the upper part of the tube, to which the air cannot gain access. This space is therefore a perfect vacuum ; and consequently the mercury in the tube is relieved from the pressure of the atmosphere, whilst that in the cup remains exposed to it ; therefore the pressure of the air on the mercury in the cup supports that in the tube- and prevents it from falling; thus...
Page xxvi - Sastras, as we welcome every spot of verdure in the desert ; and when the Hindus have only halted at a stage far short of that which we ourselves have reached, we should rejoice in being able to present to them our superior knowledge, not in the shape of a contradiction to anything that is false in their views, but as the legitimate development of what is true.
Page 29 - Tricks, or unfairness in disputation (chhala), or the opposing of a proposition by means of assuming a different sense from that which the objector well knows the propounder intended to convey by his terms. It is distinguished as verbal misconstruing of what is ambiguous, as perverting, in a literal sense, what is said in a metaphorical one, and as generalising what is particular.
Page 89 - When the aerial vibrations meet with an obstacle, having a hard and regular surface, such as a wall, or rock, they are reflected back to the ear, and produce the same sound a second time; but the sound will then appear to proceed, from the object by which it is reflected. If the vibrations fall perpendicularly on the obstacle, they are reflected back in the same line; if obliquely, the sound returns obliquely, in the opposite direction, the angle of reflection being equal to the angle of incidence.
Page xvii - ... imitate the least commendable of the peculiarities of the latter; a self-sufficient assumption of superiority taking the place of the humility which a mere entrance within the portals of the vast field of knowledge might be expected to produce. It has also greatly incapacitated these youths for the task of communicating to their countrymen the knowledge which they have themselves acquired, even if other circumstances favored the endeavour ; so that except to whatever extent circumstances may...
Page 85 - ... for it is contrary to the law of the equilibrium of fluids, that the mercury in the tube should not descend to a level with that in the cup. Mrs. B. The mercury that has fallen from the tube into the cup, has left a vacant space in the upper part of the tube, to which the air cannot gain access ; this space is therefore a perfect vacuum ; and consequently the mercury in the tube is relieved from the pressure of the atmosphere, whilst that in the cup remains exposed to it.
Page xxvi - I would beg the readers attention to the two facts, that a mind can be taught only by means of the knowledge that is already in it ; and that a piece of knowledge in any mind —more especially in a mind unfavourably prepossessed — is an obstacle to the reception of any system which, by neglecting to recognize, appears to deny, the truth of that piece of knowledge.* Whatever in the...
Page 98 - ... entering the glass, is undone on its quitting it. Or, to express myself more scientifically, when a ray of light passes from one medium into another, and through that into the first again, the two refractions being equal and in opposite directions, no sensible effect is produced. Mrs. B. This is the case when the two surfaces- of the refracting medium are parallel to each other ; if they are not, the two refractions may be made in the same direction, as I shall show you.
Page 81 - ... in the pot. The particles of water at the bottom of the pot are pressed upon by the particles above them ; to this pressure they •will yield, if there is any mode of making way for the superior particles, and as they cannot descend, they will change their direction and rise in the spout. Suppose the tea-pot to be filled with columns of particles of water similar to that described in fig.
Page 82 - ... considered, the weight has nothing to do with the quantity of water displaced ; for a cubic inch of gold does not occupy more space, and therefore will not displace more water, than a cubic inch of ivory, or any other substance that will sink in water. Well, you will perhaps be surprised to hear that the gold will weigh less in water than it did out of it. EMILY. And for what reason ? MRS.

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