A Theory of Architecture

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UMBAU-VERLAG Harald Püschel, 2006 - Architecture - 278 pages
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More than a decade in the making, this is a textbook of architecture rich with design techniques and useful for every architect whether a first-year students or experienced practicing architects. The book teaches the reader how to design by adapting to human needs and sensibilities, yet independently of any particular style. It explains much of what people instinctively know about architecture, and puts that knowledge for the first time in a concise, understandable form. There has not been such a book treating the very essence of architecture. Preface by the Prince of Wales
 

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Contents

THE LAWS OF ARCHITECTURE FROM A PHYSICISTS PERSPECTIVE
27
A SCIENTIFIC BASIS FOR CREATING ARCHITECTURAL FORMS
45
HIERARCHICAL COOPERATION IN ARCHITECTURE THE MATHEMATICAL NECESSITY FOR ORNAMENT
63
THE SENSORY VALUE OF ORNAMENT
84
LIFE AND COMPLEXITY IN ARCHITECTURE FROM A THERMODYNAMIC ANALOGY
105
ARCHITECTURE PATTERNS AND MATHEMATICS
129
PAVEMENTS AS EMBODIMENTS OF MEANING FOR A FRACTAL MIND
144
MODULARITY AND THE NUMBER OF DESIGN CHOICES
159
GEOMETRICAL FUNDAMENTALISM
172
DARWINIAN PROCESSES AND MEMES IN ARCHITECTURE A MEMETIC THEORY OF MODERNISM
195
TWO LANGUAGES FOR ARCHITECTURE
220
ARCHITECTURAL MEMES IN A UNIVERSE OF INFORMATION
242
Glossary
264
References
272
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Page 272 - An Overview of the Structure of the Design Process," in Emerging Methods in Environmental Design and Planning.

About the author (2006)

Dr. Nikos Salingaros is regarded as one of the world's leading architectural theorists.He is professor of mathematics at the University of Texas San Antonio, and is on the architecture faculties of the University of Rome, and Delft University of Technology. He is consultant to the Schools of Architecture of the Catholic University of Portugal, Viseu, and Tecnologico de Monterrey, Mexico.

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