A Theory of Argument

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Cambridge University Press, Mar 6, 2006 - Philosophy
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A Theory of Argument is an advanced textbook intended for students in philosophy, communications studies and linguistics who have completed at least one course in argumentation theory, information logic, critical thinking or formal logic. Containing nearly 400 exercises, Mark Vorobej develops a novel approach to argument interpretation and evaluation. One of the key themes of the book is that we cannot succeed in distinguishing good argument from bad arguments until we learn to listen carefully to others. Part I develops a relativistic account of argument cogency that allows for rational disagreement. Part II offers a comprehensive and rigorous account of argument diagramming. Hybrid arguments are contrasted with linked and convergent arguments, and a novel technique is introduced for graphically recording disagreements with authorial claims.
 

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Contents

1
3
2
47
3
111
4
161
By numberingthepropositionswithinthispassageandby recognizing
164
capturedifferencesinhowauthorsconceiveofthegroundingrelations
175
V
180
1 is employed twice by the author of passage I
181
5
224
a 1 Polly is pertinacious 2 Polly is promiscuous So
232
D1
234
A2
235
NOT 6
237
F
238
I
246
6
271

V V
182
However since its more elegant well also allow
183
this argumentative passage by the following single diagram
186
R34
193
Suppose that some normal author has presented you with an
199
or
204
U
208
V
209
F
278
H
281
in diagraming a hybrid argument we ought to display one
282
I1
283
N1
292
O
293
Yes No
319

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About the author (2006)

Mark Vorobej is Associate Professor of Philosophy and Director, Centre for Peace Studies, at McMaster University in Canada.

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