A Theory of Art: Inexhaustibility by Contrast

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SUNY Press, Jun 30, 1982 - Art - 246 pages
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The richness of art is manifested in contrast: contrast with other works of art, other features of human experience, other times and places, and other forms of judgment and understanding. The possibilities of contrast are inexhaustible. Every being shares this inexhaustibility of openness to novel possibilities, although inexhaustibility is most fully realized in art.

The general theory of art and aesthetic value developed in this book is based on the notions of inexhaustibility and contrast and has important forebears in Kant, Coleridge, and Whitehead. The theory allows art to be located relative to otheR spheres of judgment—science, action, and philosophy. The theory allows a new perspective on interpretation and criticism. Ross presents and defines a new synthetic form of understanding works of art that offers an alternative to the skepticism that haunts so many theories of interpretation.
 

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Contents

II
1
III
13
IV
16
V
19
VI
22
VII
25
VIII
26
IX
29
XXVIII
118
XXIX
124
XXX
131
XXXI
136
XXXII
143
XXXIII
147
XXXIV
152
XXXV
153

X
32
XI
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XII
38
XIII
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XIV
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XV
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XVI
53
XVII
58
XVIII
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XIX
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XX
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XXI
94
XXII
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XXIII
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XXIV
107
XXV
111
XXVI
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XXVII
117
XXXVI
155
XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLII
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XLIV
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XLV
186
XLVI
189
XLVII
195
XLVIII
196
XLIX
214
L
222
LI
226
LII
237
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About the author (1982)

Stephen David Ross, Professor of Philosophy at the State University of New York at Binghamton, is the author of Transition to an Ordinal Metaphysics and Philosophical Mysteries, both published by SUNY Press.

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