A Theory of Distributed Objects: Asynchrony - Mobility - Groups - Components

Front Cover
Springer Science & Business Media, Apr 13, 2005 - Computers - 346 pages

Distributed and communicating objects are becoming ubiquitous. In global, Grid and Peer-to-Peer computing environments, extensive use is made of objects interacting through method calls. So far, no general formalism has been proposed for the foundation of such systems.

Caromel and Henrio are the first to define a calculus for distributed objects interacting using asynchronous method calls with generalized futures, i.e., wait-by-necessity -- a must in large-scale systems, providing both high structuring and low coupling, and thus scalability. The authors provide very generic results on expressiveness and determinism, and the potential of their approach is further demonstrated by its capacity to cope with advanced issues such as mobility, groups, and components.

Researchers and graduate students will find here an extensive review of concurrent languages and calculi, with comprehensive figures and summaries.

Developers of distributed systems can adopt the many implementation strategies that are presented and analyzed in detail.

Preface by Luca Cardelli

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

VIII
3
X
5
XII
6
XIV
10
XV
11
XVI
14
XIX
15
XX
17
XCIX
172
C
175
CI
176
CII
178
CIII
181
CIV
183
CV
184
CVI
186

XXI
21
XXIV
23
XXV
26
XXVI
30
XXVII
31
XXVIII
35
XXIX
37
XXX
40
XXXI
42
XXXII
43
XXXIII
45
XXXIV
49
XXXV
51
XXXVI
54
XXXVII
56
XXXVIII
63
XL
65
XLII
66
XLV
68
XLVI
69
XLVIII
71
L
72
LI
73
LIV
75
LV
76
LVI
77
LVII
79
LVIII
80
LIX
81
LX
87
LXI
89
LXIII
91
LXIV
98
LXV
101
LXVII
104
LXVIII
105
LXIX
107
LXX
111
LXXI
113
LXXII
114
LXXIII
115
LXXIV
117
LXXV
118
LXXVI
121
LXXVII
124
LXXVIII
126
LXXX
127
LXXXI
130
LXXXII
137
LXXXIII
141
LXXXV
143
LXXXVI
144
LXXXVII
145
LXXXVIII
146
XC
147
XCI
151
XCII
153
XCIII
154
XCIV
157
XCV
160
XCVI
162
XCVII
169
XCVIII
170
CVII
189
CVIII
190
CIX
191
CX
192
CXII
195
CXIII
198
CXIV
201
CXV
206
CXVI
213
CXVII
215
CXIX
217
CXX
219
CXXI
220
CXXII
222
CXXIII
223
CXXIV
225
CXXV
227
CXXVI
229
CXXVII
232
CXXVIII
235
CXXIX
237
CXXX
238
CXXXII
239
CXXXIII
241
CXXXIV
242
CXXXVI
245
CXXXVII
246
CXXXVIII
248
CXXXIX
249
CXLI
250
CXLV
251
CXLVI
253
CXLVII
254
CXLVIII
255
CXLIX
256
CL
257
CLI
261
CLII
269
CLV
270
CLVII
273
CLVIII
276
CLIX
281
CLX
283
CLXI
288
CLXII
290
CLXIII
291
CLXIV
295
CLXV
296
CLXVI
298
CLXVII
299
CLXVIII
300
CLXIX
301
CLXX
304
CLXXI
305
CLXXII
306
CLXXIII
309
CLXXIV
321
CLXXV
327
CLXXVI
329
CLXXVII
331
CLXXVIII
333
CLXXIX
343
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2005)

Denis Caromel is full professor at University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis (UNSA). He is also member of the Institut Universitaire de France (IUF), a multi-disciplinary national academia that selects a few professors based on the excellence of their research records. His research interests include parallel, concurrent, and distributed object-oriented programming, the semantics of sequential and parallel languages for the sake of automatic and semi-automatic parallelization.

Ludovic Henrio graduated from Ecole Polytechnique in Paris. He is currently a PHD candidate at University of Nice Sophia Antipolis -- CNRS -- INRIA. His research interests include semantics for concurrent, parallel and distributed calculi, static analysis, design and implementation of object-oriented languages.

Bibliographic information