A Theory of Parties and Electoral Systems

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Johns Hopkins University Press, Sep 13, 2007 - Political Science - 168 pages
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Political parties and elections are the mainsprings of modern democracy. In this classic volume, Richard S. Katz explores the problem of how a given electoral system affects the role of political parties and the way in which party members are elected. He develops and tests a theory of the differences in the cohesion, ideological behavior, and issue orientation of Western parliamentary parties on the basis of the electoral systems under which they compete. A standard in the field of political theory and thought, The Theory of Parties and the Electoral System contributes to a better understanding of parliamentary party structures and demonstrates the wide utility of the rationalistic approach for explaining behavior derived from the self-interest of political actors.

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Contents

Electoral Law
17
with demonstration that each must appeal to voters with
25
An Extensive Test
35
Copyright

6 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Richard S. Katz is a professor of political science at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the author, coauthor, or coeditor of several books, including Political Institutions in the United States; Party Governments: European and American Experiences; The Patron State: Government and the Arts in Europe, North America, and Japan; and Handbook of Party Politics. He is also coeditor of the European Journal of Political Research.

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