A Theory of Parties and Electoral Systems

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JHU Press, Jan 14, 2011 - Political Science - 168 pages
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Political parties and elections are the mainsprings of modern democracy. In this classic volume, Richard S. Katz explores the problem of how a given electoral system affects the role of political parties and the way in which party members are elected. He develops and tests a theory of the differences in the cohesion, ideological behavior, and issue orientation of Western parliamentary parties on the basis of the electoral systems under which they compete. A standard in the field of political theory and thought, The Theory of Parties and the Electoral System contributes to a better understanding of parliamentary party structures and demonstrates the wide utility of the rationalistic approach for explaining behavior derived from the self-interest of political actors.

 

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Contents

Preface
INTRODUCTION
PART IStructural and Cognitive Change
CHAPTER ONE
CHAPTER TWO
CHAPTER THREE
CHAPTER FOUR
PART IISocialization and Deviance
CHAPTER EIGHT
PART IVAutonomy and Regulation
CHAPTER NINE
CHAPTER TEN
CHAPTER ELEVEN
PART VContemporary and Historical Views
CHAPTER TWELVE
CHAPTER THIRTEEN

CHAPTER FIVE
CHAPTER SIX
PART IIIExperience of the Academic Career
CHAPTER SEVEN
Contributors
Index
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

Richard S. Katz is a professor of political science at the Johns Hopkins University. He is the author, coauthor, or coeditor of several books, including Political Institutions in the United States; Party Governments: European and American Experiences; The Patron State: Government and the Arts in Europe, North America, and Japan; and Handbook of Party Politics. He is also coeditor of the European Journal of Political Research.

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