A Tibetan-English Dictionary: With Special Reference to the Prevailing Dialects, to which is Added an English-Tibetan Vocabulary

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Motilal Banarsidass Publ., 1987 - English language - 671 pages
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The pesent Dictionary is an attempt to give a rational account of values and meanings of words in Tibetan language, to distinguish the various transitions in periods of literature and varieties of dialect, and to make sure of each step by the help of accurate and copious illustrations and examples. The author has not restricted himself only to the Classical Period of the Tibetan literature. He has endeavoured to deal with the Tibetan language as a whole. His dictionary derives its matter and sprinciples equally from the literature and from the speech of the people. Each word has been made the object of observation in its relation to the contents as it occurs in books, and in its value and place among others when it is used in common conversation. But in the latter case it has been an uphill task, since the spoken language has as many dialects as the country its provinces. However an attempt has been made to define the rangeand fix the meaning of current words far as possible. A number of diacritical marks have been used, following the system of Prof. Lepsius, for the exact pronunciation of Tibetan letters and words. The marks are of manifest description and cannot be startling to any general reader. The book is documented with Introduction which contains Tibetan alphabet, phonetic table for comparing the different dialects, abbreviations and the method of pronunciation. To increase its usefulness, the author has added at the end an English-Tibetan Vocabulary which will be welcomed by the reader and will be welcomed by the reader and will be serviceable to the general ause of learning the Tibetan language
 

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Page v - Körös, which appeared in 1834. This work deserves all eulogy; but the Professor's manner, which imitates that of a master commending a pupil, is, though on other grounds, as unwarranted and as offensive in this as in the former case. The work of Csoma de Körös is that of an original investigator and the fruit of almost unparalleled determination and patience. The compiler, in order to dedicate himself to the study of Tibetan literature, lived like a monk for years among the inmates of a Tibetan...
Page iv - Srongtsangampo, was sent to India to learn Sanskrit. His invention of the Tibetan alphabet gave a twofold impulse: for several centuries the wisdom of India and the ingenuity of Tibet laboured in unison and with the greatest industry and enthusiasm at the work of translation. The tribute due to real genius must be awarded to these early pioneers of Tibetan grammar. They had to grapple with the infinite wealth and refinement of Sanskrit, they had to save the independence of their own tongue, while...
Page iv - Tibetan work may thus, here and there, look in vain for the assistance he expects. On the other hand, a consistent attempt is here made for the first time, 1. to give a rational account of the development of the values and meanings of words in this language; 2. to distinguish precisely the various transitions in periods of literature and varieties of dialect; 3. to make sure of each step by the help of accurate and copious illustrations and examples. I have done my utmost to arrive at certainty where,...
Page 10 - dkon-mcog* suggests the idea of some supernatural power, the existence of which he feels in his heart, and the nature and properties of which he attributes more or less to the three agents mentioned above, we are fully entitled to assign to the word dkon-mcog also the signification of God, though the sublime conception which the Bible connects with this word, viz.
Page xxi - Hindi language. Dr. Hooker, Himalayan Journals, ibidem, in the same place, idem, the same id est, that is imperative mood impersonal...
Page iv - ... entitled the Classical Period, for the sanctity of the religious message conferred a corresponding reputation and tradition of excellence upon the form , in which it was conveyed. This period begins in the first half of the seventh century, when Thonmi Sambhota, the minister of king Srongtsangampo, was sent to India to learn Sanskrit. His invention of the Tibetan alphabet gave a twofold impulse: for several centuries the wisdom of India and the ingenuity of Tibet laboured in unison and with the...

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