A Toast to Love and Sacrifice

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AuthorHouse, Nov 14, 2008 - Fiction - 596 pages
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The book comprises three tales written in "classical" verse (i.e., strict rhythms and rhyme.) Although in the form of fairy tales and fables, they deal with important social and historic issues.

"A Tale of Dancing Chair" decries racial discrimination and expounds the idea that, regardless of outside help, success comes to those who don't shy away from hard work, are willing and able to use creative potential to the fullest, and stand up to bigotry, injustice, and unfair judgement.

"A Tale of Captive Puffins . . ." reflects upon events in the history of Russian/Soviet Jewry in the twentieth Century. To recognize historic prototypes of the fable's characters, one should read up on history of Tsarist Russia and Soviet Union, Weimar and Nazi Germany. However, it is not a prerequisite: the Tale is intended to trigger reader's interest in those chapters of history.

"A Tale of Boy Nightingale . . . " is intended to make dents in prejudices against unconventional" (gay and lesbian) families. It proclaims love, respect, and loyalty as traits identifying and holding together families, asserts that friendship between children from different families is greatest hope and strongest weapon in the struggle against prejudices still prevalent in society.

 

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Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
22
Section 3
41
Section 4
54
Section 5
77
Section 6
91
Section 7
113
Section 8
125
Section 17
289
Section 18
318
Section 19
341
Section 20
364
Section 21
388
Section 22
415
Section 23
446
Section 24
469

Section 9
157
Section 10
184
Section 11
193
Section 12
213
Section 13
229
Section 14
240
Section 15
251
Section 16
262
Section 25
493
Section 26
502
Section 27
508
Section 28
550
Section 29
559
Section 30
577
Section 31
587
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