A Tomb for Boris Davidovich

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Dalkey Archive Press, 2001 - Fiction - 145 pages
2 Reviews
Composed of seven dark tales, A Tomb for Boris Davidovich presents variations on the theme of political and social self-destruction throughout Eastern Europe in the first half of the twentieth century. The characters in these stories are caught in a world of political hypocrisy, which ultimately leads to death, their common fate. Although the stories Kis tells are based on historical events, the beauty and precision of his prose elevates these ostensibly true stories into works of literary art that transcend the politics of their time.
 

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Contents

Maklakov 84
8
Marseilles
19
Moscow
60
Pamiers 20
73
Suzdal 59
84
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About the author (2001)

Danilo Kis was born on February 22, 1935 in Subotica, a small town north of Serb.He moved to Hungary during World War 2. He attended the University of Belgrade where he studied General and Comparative Literature and graduated in 1958. He wrote for the Vidici Magazine. He wrote novels, essays and poetry. His works include: Attic, Psalm 44, Garden, Ashes, a Tomb for Boris Davidovich and Encyclopedia of the Dead. In 1986, he was named knight of Arts and Letters. He spent most of his life in Belgrade - until his last decade which he spent between France and Belgrade. He spent a number of years as a lecturer in France. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature and was expected to win however he died in Paris on October 15, 1989 before it was announced.

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