A Tomb for Boris Davidovich

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Dalkey Archive Press, 2001 - Fiction - 145 pages
6 Reviews
Composed of seven dark tales, A Tomb for Boris Davidovich presents variations on the theme of political and social self-destruction throughout Eastern Europe in the first half of the twentieth century. The characters in these stories are caught in a world of political hypocrisy, which ultimately leads to death, their common fate. Although the stories Kis tells are based on historical events, the beauty and precision of his prose elevates these ostensibly true stories into works of literary art that transcend the politics of their time.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - labfs39 - LibraryThing

This thin volume is part of the Writers from the Other Europe series, edited by Philip Roth. It contains seven short works, including the titular story, with interwoven themes and some recurring ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - HadriantheBlind - LibraryThing

A collection of seven sparse tales about the dark comedies of life in the Comintern, and how revolutions devour their own children, as Saturn did. Bitterly mocking these cruel moments of fate. Read them all in one sitting, after bedtime, and will stay with me long after. Read full review

Contents

Maklakov 84
8
Marseilles
19
Moscow
60
Pamiers 20
73
Suzdal 59
84
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About the author (2001)

Danilo Kis was born on February 22, 1935 in Subotica, a small town north of Serb.He moved to Hungary during World War 2. He attended the University of Belgrade where he studied General and Comparative Literature and graduated in 1958. He wrote for the Vidici Magazine. He wrote novels, essays and poetry. His works include: Attic, Psalm 44, Garden, Ashes, a Tomb for Boris Davidovich and Encyclopedia of the Dead. In 1986, he was named knight of Arts and Letters. He spent most of his life in Belgrade - until his last decade which he spent between France and Belgrade. He spent a number of years as a lecturer in France. He was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature and was expected to win however he died in Paris on October 15, 1989 before it was announced.

Joseph Brodsky was born in Leningrad on May 24, 1940. He left school at the age of fifteen, taking jobs in a morgue, a mill, a ship's boiler room, and a geological expedition. During this time he taught himself English and Polish and began writing poetry. His first poems appeared mainly in Syntax, a Leningrad underground literary magazine. In 1964, he was tried and sentenced to five years of administrative exile for the charge of parasitism. As a result of intervention by prominent Soviet cultural figures, he was freed in 1965. In 1972, under tremendous pressure from the authorities, he emigrated to the United States. He wrote nine volumes of poetry and several collections of essays. His works include A Part of Speech, To Urania, Watermark, On Grief and Reason, So Forth, and Collected Poems in English. He received the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1987 and was named poet laureate of the United States, the first poet whose native language was not English to achieve this honor. He died of a heart attack on January 28, 1996.

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