A Treasury of Kahlil Gibran

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Carol Publishing Group, 1975 - Literary Criticism - 417 pages
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Kahlil Gibran, author of "The Prophet," is known throughout the world as The Immortal Prophet of Lebanon and the Savant of his Age. The very heart of the mystic East emerges in this monumental volume of the magnificent poetry and prose that he wrote in his beloved mother tongue, Arabic.

Translated superbly into English, here are the nine great books, gathered together in one giant volume and now available in a paperback edition for Gibran's myriad admirers in America.

In these writings "the Dante of the twentieth century" offers verses and lyric prose which possess all the grandeur of rich music. Here are the great truths and heartening joys, drawn from the tears and sufferings of man. Here are pages that sparkle with simile and symbolism, of which Gibran is the world's unquestioned master.

And here is the profound exaltation of a great soul that has found salvation in the heart of sorrow. In this book you will find wistful beauty, fierce anger, spellbinding majesty, and the abiding peace that Eastern wisdom seeks eternally in contemplation.

The nine books which make up "A Treasury of Kahlil Gibran" contain the texts of "Secrets of the Heart," "Tears and Laughter" and "Spirits Rebellious," together with hitherto unpublished writings by Gibran, which are included in the brilliant preface by the distinguished Gibran scholar, Martin L. Wolf.

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Contents

A Poets Voice
3
Song of the Rain
11
The Life of Love
31
Copyright

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About the author (1975)

Khalil Gibran, also known as Kahlil Gibran, was born on January 6, 1883 in Northern Lebanon. As a result of his family's poverty, he received no formal education as a small child but had regular visits from the local priest who taught him about the Bible as well as the Syrian and Arabic languages. After his father was imprisoned for embezzlement and his family's property was confiscated by the authorities, his mother decided to emigrate to the United States in 1895. They settled in Boston's South End. He attended public school and art school, where he was introduced to the artist, photographer, and publisher Fred Holland Day. A publisher used some of Gibran's drawings for book covers in 1898. His family forced him to return to Lebanon to complete his education and learn the Arabic language. He enrolled in Madrasat-al-Hikmah, a Masonite-founded school, which offered a nationalistic curriculum partial to church writings, history and liturgy. He learned Arabic, French, and exceled in poetry. He returned to the United States in 1902. In 1904, he hosted his first art exhibit, which featured his allegorical and symbolic charcoal drawings. During this exhibition, he met Mary Elizabeth Haskell, who would go on to fund Gibran's artistic development for nearly his entire life. Not only was he an artist, but he also wrote poetry and other works including The Madman, The Prophet, and Sand and Foam. He died of cirrhosis of the liver and tuberculosis on April 10, 1931.

Wolf is an accomplished author.

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