A Treatise on the Measure of Damages: Or an Inquiry Into the Principles Which Govern the Amount of Pecuniary Compensation Awarded by Courts of Justice

Front Cover
Beard Books, Sep 1, 2000 - Law - 712 pages
0 Reviews
A monumental work on the subject thoroughly covering the history of legal principles and the cases up to 1912 establishing existing rules.
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Contents

I
686
II
757
III
827
IV
856
V
911
VI
944
VII
991
VIII
1029
IX
1053
X
1093
XI
1134
XII
1159
XIII
1272
XIV
1289
XV
1307
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 669 - If the payment exceeds the interest, the surplus goes toward discharging the principal, and the subsequent interest is to be computed on the balance of principal remaining due. If the payment be less than the interest, the surplus...
Page 697 - It is a well-established principle of the common law that in actions of trespass and all actions on the case for torts, a jury may inflict what are called exemplary, punitive or vindictive damages upon a defendant, having in view the enormity of his offense rather than the measure of compensation to the plaintiff.

About the author (2000)

Theodore Sedgwick, 1811-1859, a legal scholar born in Albany, New York. He practised law from 1934 to 1950, and served as United States District Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1858-1859. He wrote a number of law books as well as writing extensively for the popular press.

Bibliographic information