A Treatise on the Measure of Damages: Or an Inquiry Into the Principles Which Govern the Amount of Pecuniary Compensation Awarded by Courts of Justice

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Beard Books, Sep 1, 2000 - Law - 672 pages
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This monumental work sets forth two major treatments of the subject. Four volumes and nearly 3,000 pages thoroughly present an interesting and careful historical examination and comparison with civil law principles, and discuss reasons for existing rules suggested by history or analogy or laid down in some 30,000 cases up to 1812. The varied aspects of compensation and damages are covered, as well as related topics such as the measure and elements of value, expenses of litigation, medium of payment, and interest.
 

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Contents

II
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V
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VI
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VIII
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IX
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X
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XI
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CCXXVII
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CCXXVIII
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CCXXIX
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CCXXX
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CCXXXI
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CCXXXII
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CCXXXIII
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CCXXXIV
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XIV
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XIX
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XXX
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XXXI
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XXXII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XLI
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XLV
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XLVIII
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L
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LI
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LIV
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LV
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LIX
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LX
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LXX
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LXXX
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LXXXVIII
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XC
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XCI
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XCIII
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XCV
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XCVII
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XCVIII
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XCIX
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C
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CI
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CII
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CIII
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CIV
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CV
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CVI
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CVII
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CVIII
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CIX
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CX
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CXI
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CXII
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CXIII
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CXIV
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CXVI
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CXVII
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CXVIII
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CXX
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CXXI
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CXXIII
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CXXIV
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CXXV
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CXXVI
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CXXVII
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CXXVIII
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CXXIX
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CXXX
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CXXXII
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CXXXIII
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CXXXIV
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CXXXV
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CXXXVI
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CXXXVII
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CXXXVIII
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CXXXIX
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CXL
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CXLI
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CXLIII
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CXLIV
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CXLV
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CXLVII
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CL
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CLI
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CLII
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CLIII
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CLV
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CLVI
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CLVIII
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CLIX
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CLX
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CLXI
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CLXV
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CLXIX
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CLXX
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CLXXI
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CLXXIII
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CLXXIV
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CLXXV
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CLXXVI
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CLXXVII
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CLXXVIII
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CLXXX
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CLXXXI
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CLXXXII
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CLXXXIII
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CLXXXIV
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CLXXXV
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CLXXXVI
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CLXXXVII
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CLXXXVIII
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CLXXXIX
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CXC
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CXCI
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CXCII
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CXCIII
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CXCIV
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CXCV
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CXCVI
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CXCVII
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CC
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CCI
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CCII
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CCIII
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CCIV
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CCV
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CCVI
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CCVII
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CCVIII
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CCIX
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CCX
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CCXI
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CCXII
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CCXIII
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CCXIV
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CCXV
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CCXVI
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CCXVII
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CCXIX
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CCXX
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CCXXI
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CCXXII
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CCXXIII
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CCXXIV
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CCXXV
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CCXXVI
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CCXXXV
327
CCXXXVI
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CCXXXVII
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CCXXXVIII
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CCXXXIX
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CCXLI
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CCXLII
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CCXLIV
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CCXLV
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CCXLVI
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CCXLVII
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CCXLVIII
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CCXLIX
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CCL
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CCLII
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CCLIII
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CCLIV
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CCLV
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CCLVI
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CCLVII
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CCLVIII
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CCLIX
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CCLX
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CCLXI
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CCLXIV
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CCLXV
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CCLXVI
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CCLXIX
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CCLXX
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CCLXXI
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CCLXXII
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CCLXXIII
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CCLXXVI
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CCLXXVII
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CCLXXVIII
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CCLXXIX
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CCLXXX
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CCLXXXI
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CCLXXXIV
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CCLXXXV
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CCLXXXVI
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CCLXXXVII
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CCLXXXVIII
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CCXC
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CCXCI
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CCXCIII
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CCXCV
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CCXCVI
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CCXCVIII
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CCXCIX
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CCC
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CCCI
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CCCXXXIX
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CCCXL
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CCCXLIX
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CCCL
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CCCLI
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CCCLIV
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CCCLVI
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CCCLVII
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CCCLVIII
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CCCLIX
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CCCLX
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CCCLXI
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CCCLXII
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CCCLXIII
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CCCLXV
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CCCLXVI
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CCCLXVII
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CCCLXIX
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CCCLXXI
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CCCLXXII
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CCCLXXV
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CCCLXXVI
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CCCLXXVII
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CCCLXXIX
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CCCLXXX
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CCCLXXXI
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CCCLXXXII
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CCCLXXXIII
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CCCLXXXIV
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CCCLXXXV
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CCCLXXXVI
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CCCLXXXVII
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CCCLXXXVIII
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CCCLXXXIX
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CCCXCI
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CCCXCII
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CCCXCIV
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CCCXCV
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CCCXCVI
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CCCXCVII
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CCCXCIX
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CD
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CDI
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CDII
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CDIII
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CDIV
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CDVI
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CDVII
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CDIX
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CDX
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CDXI
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CDXII
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CDXV
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CDXVI
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CDXVII
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CDXVIII
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CDXIX
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CDXX
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CDXXI
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CDXXII
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CDXXIII
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CDXXV
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CDXXVI
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CDXXVII
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CDXXVIII
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CDXXIX
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CDXXX
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CDXXXI
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CDXXXII
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CDXXXIII
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CDXXXIV
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CDXXXV
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CDXXXVII
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CDXXXVIII
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CDXXXIX
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CDXL
621
CDXLI
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CDXLII
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CDXLIII
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CDXLIV
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CDXLV
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CDXLVI
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Copyright

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Page 29 - We think that the true rule of law is that the person who, for his own purposes, brings on his land and collects and keeps there anything likely to do mischief if it escapes, must keep it in at his peril ; and if he does not do so, is prima facie answerable for all the damage which is the natural consequence of its escape.
Page 37 - Where one suffers in common with all the publie, although from his proximity to the obstructed way, or otherwise, from his more frequent occasion to use it he may suffer in a greater degree than others, still he cannot have an action, because it would cause such a multiplicity of suits as to be itself an intolerable evil.

About the author (2000)

Theodore Sedgwick, 1811-1859, a legal scholar born in Albany, New York. He practised law from 1934 to 1950, and served as United States District Attorney for the Southern District of New York, 1858-1859. He wrote a number of law books as well as writing extensively for the popular press.

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