A Typological Grammar of Panare: A Cariban Language of Venezuela

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BRILL, Nov 21, 2012 - Language Arts & Disciplines - 467 pages
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Panare, also known as E'apa Woromaipu, is a seriously endangered Cariban language spoken by about 3,500 people in Central Venezuela. A Typological Grammar of Panare by Thomas E. Payne and Doris L. Payne, is a full length linguistic grammar, written from a modern functional/typological perspective.
 

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Contents

Chapter One The Language and Its Speakers
1
Chapter Two Phonology and Morphophonology
41
Chapter Three Nouns and Nominals
67
Chapter Four Nominal Derivation and Possessive Denominalization
91
Chapter Five Modification
119
Organizing principles
151
Chapter Seven Verb Stem Derivation
175
Chapter Eight PastPerfective Aspect Constructions
191
Chapter Thirteen Copula constructions
303
Chapter Fourteen Voice and valence
313
epistemic and negative categories
343
Chapter Sixteen Commands and the expression of deontic modality
363
Chapter Seventeen Questions and Contrastive constructions
375
Chapter Eighteen Complementation
389
Chapter Nineteen Adverbial and medial clauses
399
Chapter Twenty Relative and modifying clauses
423

Chapter Nine NonPastperfective Aspect Constructions
211
Chapter Ten Minority Class Verbs
259
Chapter Eleven Noun phrase structure
267
Chapter Twelve Adpositional phrases and oblique constituents
291
Appendix Two Short Panare Texts
443
References
455
Index
463
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About the author (2012)

Thomas E. Payne, PhD (1985), UCLA, is Senior International Linguistics Consultant with SIL International, and Research Associate in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Oregon. He publishes books and research articles in descriptive linguistics and grammar writing. Doris L. Payne, Ph.D. (1985) UCLA, is professor at the University of Oregon and a consultant with SIL International. She has published on Native American and East African languages, and leads workshops around the world focused on morphosyntax and discourse.