A Universe from Nothing: Why There Is Something Rather Than Nothing

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Simon and Schuster, Jan 10, 2012 - Science - 202 pages
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“WHERE DID THE UNIVERSE COME FROM? WHAT WAS THERE BEFORE IT? WHAT WILL THE FUTURE BRING? AND FINALLY, WHY IS THERE SOMETHING RATHER THAN NOTHING?”

Lawrence Krauss’s provocative answers to these and other timeless questions in a wildly popular lecture now on YouTube have attracted almost a million viewers. The last of these questions in particular has been at the center of religious and philosophical debates about the existence of God, and it’s the supposed counterargument to anyone who questions the need for God. As Krauss argues, scientists have, however, historically focused on other, more pressing issues—such as figuring out how the universe actually functions, which can ultimately help us to improve the quality of our lives.

Now, in a cosmological story that rivets as it enlightens, pioneering theoretical physicist Lawrence Krauss explains the groundbreaking new scientific advances that turn the most basic philosophical questions on their heads. One of the few prominent scientists today to have actively crossed the chasm between science and popular culture, Krauss reveals that modern science is addressing the question of why there is something rather than nothing, with surprising and fascinating results. The staggeringly beautiful experimental observations and mind-bending new theories are all described accessibly in A Universe from Nothing, and they suggest that not only can something arise from nothing, something will always arise from nothing.

With his characteristic wry humor and wonderfully clear explanations, Krauss takes us back to the beginning of the beginning, presenting the most recent evidence for how our universe evolved—and the implications for how it’s going to end. It will provoke, challenge, and delight readers as it looks at the most basic underpinnings of existence in a whole new way. And this knowledge that our universe will be quite different in the future from today has profound implications and directly affects how we live in the present. As Richard Dawkins has described it: This could potentially be the most important scientific book with implications for supernaturalism since Darwin.

A fascinating antidote to outmoded philosophical and religious thinking, A Universe from Nothing is a provocative, game-changing entry into the debate about the existence of God and everything that exists. “Forget Jesus,” Krauss has argued, “the stars died so you could be born.”
 

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A comment only from reading snippets of the book but specifically the notion of not needing a creator. I fall into the group who believe or hope if nothing else that a creator in some way may have something in store for us. Be that as it may, the opposite tact is seemingly as dogmatic by at least as much as the religious purport to belief in God in that your pushing the create from nothing where this becomes your God even without wanting to acknowledge it as such. For your opinion omits many aspects and possibilities that would easily put your theory out to pasture.  

Contents

Beginnings
1
Weighing the Universe
23
Light from the Beginning of Time
39
Much Ado About Nothing
55
The Runaway Universe
75
The Free Lunch at the End of the Universe
91
Our Miserable Future
105
A Grand Accident?
121
Nothing Is Something
141
Nothing Is Unstable
153
Brave New Worlds
171
Epilogue
181
Afterword by Richard Dawkins
187
Index
193
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About the author (2012)

Lawrence Krauss, a renowned theoretical physicist, is director of the Origins Project at Arizona State University. He is the author of more than 300 scientific publications and nine books, including the international bestsellers, A Universe from Nothing and The Physics of Star Trek. The recipient of numerous awards, Krauss is a regular columnist for newspapers and magazines, including The New Yorker, and he appears frequently on radio, television, and in feature films. Krauss lives in Portland, Oregon, and Tempe, Arizona.

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