A Valentine for Patti

Front Cover
Scholastic, Incorporated, 1991 - Schools - 121 pages
Patti has a lot on her mind these days. She's trying to help a new girl at school feel at home. And Valentine's Day is coming up. SHould Patti make a special Valentine for a special secret someone? Will she get one in return? Only time will tell.

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User Review  - AnnaLovesBooks - LibraryThing

ISBN 0590439278 – Sleepover Friends, overall, hasn’t impressed me as a series because it seems, like several other series, to be a slightly less well done imitation of the Babysitters Club series (and ... Read full review

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ISBN 0590439278 – Sleepover Friends, overall, hasn’t impressed me as a series because it seems, like several other series, to be a slightly less well done imitation of the Babysitters Club series (and the spinoffs of that series). Both series contain many of the same elements, relationships and even have some plotlines in common. That said, I find that, taken individually, the SF books are quite good – and I’m beginning to think I need to re-think my take of the series as a whole!
There’s a new girl in 5B. Her name is Hope, which some of the kids find weird, and she dresses like a hippie, which they find even weirder. Patti and her friends try to get to know her, but have little luck. Kate thinks Hope is hiding something and Patti’s beginning to wonder herself. At the same time, Patti is worried about Horace, her younger brother, who’s been moved up a grade and is suffering from some teasing. All of this is going on as Valentine’s Day, complete with a class party, approaches and Patti frets over whether or not she should give Henry a special valentine. And, of course, whether he’ll give her one, as well.
Sure, there’s the BSC comparison, but really – you’ve got more than enough room for more books, don’t you? One positive I’ve been finding is that, if your daughter (these really are girly kind of series) isn’t into babysitting, she might identify more with the Sleepover Friends, or even the Gymnasts series by Elizabeth Levy. The stories within one series can be a little too similar to a story in another series, but that may simply be just because they’re common tales nowadays and readers will relate to them. Best of all, Sleepover Friends don’t really have to be read in order, so if you happen to pick up a random handful, they’re still enjoyable! RL4, ages 8-12.
- AnnaLovesBooks
 

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