A View of the English Stage: Or, A Series of Dramatic Criticisms

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Robert Stodart, 1818 - 461 sider
Collected dramatic criticism by William Hazlitt, one of the highest regarded critic and essayists in the history of the English language.
 

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Side 217 - Pray, do not mock me : I am a very foolish fond old man, Fourscore and upward, not an hour more nor less ; And, to deal plainly, I fear I am not in my perfect mind. Methinks I should know you, and know this man ; Yet I am doubtful...
Side 53 - Dangerous conceits are, in their natures, poisons, Which at the first are scarce found to distaste, But, with a little act upon the blood, Burn like the mines of sulphur.
Side 211 - Hear, nature, hear ; dear goddess, hear ! — Suspend thy purpose, if thou didst intend To make this creature fruitful ! Into her womb convey sterility ! Dry up in her the organs of increase ; And from her derogate body never spring A babe to honour her ! If she must teem, Create her child of spleen ; that it may live, And be a thwart disnatured torment to her...
Side 217 - Methinks I should know you and know this man; Yet I am doubtful; for I am mainly ignorant What place this is, and all the skill I have Remembers not these garments; nor I know not Where I did lodge last night. Do not laugh at me; For, as I am a man, I think this lady To be my child Cordelia.
Side 32 - I have liv'd long enough : my way of life Is fallen into the sear, the yellow leaf : And that which should accompany old age, As honour, love, obedience, troops of friends, I must not look to have ; but, in their stead, Curses not loud, but deep, mouth-honour, breath, Which the poor heart would fain deny, and dare not.
Side 216 - Tom? whom the foul fiend hath led through fire and through flame, through ford and whirlpool, o'er bog and quagmire; that hath laid knives under his pillow, and halters in his pew...
Side 193 - Man, proud man, Drest in a little brief authority, Plays such fantastic tricks before high Heaven As make the angels weep.
Side 152 - The web of our life is of a mingled yarn, good and ill together...
Side 82 - All school-days' friendship, childhood innocence? We, Hermia, like two artificial gods, Have with our needles created both one flower, Both on one sampler, sitting on one cushion, Both warbling of one song, both in one key; As if our hands, our sides, voices, and minds, Had been incorporate.
Side 88 - Ay, but to die, and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become 120 A kneaded clod ; and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods...

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