A Void

Front Cover
Vintage, 2008 - Classical fiction - 284 pages
Anton Vowl is missing. Ransacking his Paris flat, a group of his faithful companions trawl through his diary for any hint as to his location and, insidiously, a ghost, from Vowl's past starts to cast its malignant shadow. This virtuoso story, chock-full of plots and subplots, shows the skill of both author and translator who impart all the action without a crucial grammatical prop: the letter 'e'.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - stillatim - LibraryThing

This is a perfect test-case for literature of constraint. Perec's constraint is tied to the content of his work (i.e., people die when they realize all the es are missing); his work is interesting ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - JBD1 - LibraryThing

As a translation, brilliant. As a story, just okay, but worth it. Writing a book with such a void is no small task, and both author and translator pull it off with aplomb. Playful and curious from start to finish. Read full review

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About the author (2008)

Georges Perec (1936-82) won the Prix Renaudot in 1965 for his first novel Things: A Story of the Sixties, and went on to exercise his unrivalled mastery of language in almost every imaginable kind of writing, from the apparently trivial to the deeply personal. He composed acrostics, anagrams, autobiography, criticism, crosswords, descriptions of dreams, film scripts, heterograms, lipograms, memories, palindromes, plays, poetry, radio plays, recipes, riddles, stories short and long, travel notes, univocalics, and, of course, novels. Life: A User's Manual, which draws on many of Perec's other works, appeared in 1978 after nine years in the making and was acclaimed a masterpiece to put beside Joyce's Ulysses. It won the Prix Medicis and established Perec's international reputation.

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