Translator's preface. Introduction by Krusenstern. Instructions for the astronomical observations on this voyage, by Dr. Hörner. Preface by O. v. Kotzebue. Journal of the voyage

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1821 - Voyages around the world
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Page 219 - ... revolution. The place which, by some accident, had fallen in, and is now exposed to the sun and air, melts away, and a good deal of water flows into the sea. An indisputable proof that what we saw was real ice, is the quantity of mammoths...
Page 207 - I cannot describe the strange sensation which I now experienced at the idea that I perhaps stood at the entrance of the so long sought north-east passage, and that fate had chosen me to be the discoverer. I felt my heart oppressed, and at the same time an impatience which would not let me rest, and was still increased by the perfect calm. To satisfy myself, at least by going on shore, and clearly observing from some eminence the direction of the coast, I had two boats got ready, at •which our naturalists...
Page 39 - Unshaken in their ardour, they have treated with scorn the insidious attempts which we understand have been made to discourage them from the glorious enterprize. With equal contempt we notice (in quarters, too, where decency ought to have imposed silence) insinuations of the inutility of the measure. A philosopher should despise the narrowminded notions entertained by those who, viewing the subject as merely one of profit and loss, are unable to form any other notion of its utility ; and have just...
Page 219 - I had a fire made of driftwood, which we found everywhere in plenty ; we dried our clothes, and prepared a refreshing soup. It seemed as if fortune had sent this storm, to enable us to make a very remarkable discovery, which we owe to Dr. Eschscholtz. We had climbed much about during our stay, without discovering that we were on real ice-bergs. The doctor, who had extended his excursions, found part of the bank broken down, and saw, to his astonishment, that the interior of the mountain, consisted...
Page 208 - Five of them, each with eight to ten men, all armed with lances and bows, soon landed near us. At the head of each boat was a fox-skin, on a high pole, with which they beckoned to us, uttering, at the same time, the loudest cries. I ordered my crew to be ' prepared for defence ; and went myself, with our gentlemen, to meet the Americans, who, on...
Page 220 - An indisputable proof that what we saw was real ice, is the quantity of mammoths' teeth and bones, which were exposed to view by the melting, and among which I myself found a very fine tooth. We could not assign any reason for a strong smell, like that of burnt horn, which we perceived in this place. The covering of these mountains, on which the most luxuriant grass grows to a certain height, is only half a foot thick, and consists of a mixture of clay, sand, and earth ; below which the ice gradually...
Page 219 - ... rises almost perpendicularly out of the sea, to the height of a hundred feet; and then runs off, rising still higher. We saw masses of the purest ice of the height of a hundred feet, which are under a cover of moss and grass; and could not have been produced but by some ter»
Page 276 - Toaquin,2 which lies on a tongue of land, consisting of high rocks, and forming the southern entrance, we saw many soldiers on foot and on horseback, and in the fortress itself they were employed in loading the cannon. The entrance of the harbour is so narrow, that you are obliged to pass the fortress within musket-shot. As we drew near, they enquired through a speaking trumpet, to what nation we belonged, the Russian Imperial flag not being known here.
Page 207 - ... fathoms. We landed without difficulty near a hill, which I immediately ascended : from the summit I could nowhere perceive land in the strait; the high mountains to the north either formed islands, or were a coast by themselves ; for that the two coasts could not be connected together was evident, even from the great difference between this very low and that remarkably high land. From the eminence...
Page 302 - Tamaahmaah desired him to say to me as follows: 'I learn that you are the commander of a ship of war, and are engaged in a voyage similar to those of Cook and Vancouver, and consequently do not engage in trade; it is therefore my intention not to carry on any trade with you, but to provide you gratis with everything that my islands produce.

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