A Wilder West: Rodeo in Western Canada

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UBC Press, Jul 1, 2012 - History - 312 pages
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The rodeo cowboy is one of the most evocative images of the Wild West. The master of the frontier, he is renowned for his masculinity, toughness, and skill. A Wilder West returns to rodeo's small-town roots to explore how rodeo simultaneously embodies and subverts our traditional understandings of power relations between man and nature, women and men, settlers and Aboriginal peoples.

An important contact zone a chaotic and unpredictable place of encounter rodeo has challenged expected social hierarchies, bringing people together across racial and gender divides to create friendships, rivalries, and unexpected intimacies. At the rodeo, Aboriginal riders became local heroes, and rodeo queens spoke their minds.

A Wilder West complicates the idea of western Canada as a "white man's country" and shows how rural rodeos have been communities in which different rules applied. Lavishly illustrated, this creative history will change the way we see the West's most controversial sport.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
1 An OldTimers Town
23
2 Truly Western in Its Character
62
3 A Sport Not a Carnival Act
106
4 Heavens No Lets Keep It Rodeo
133
5 Going Pro
174
6 Where the Cowboys Are Indians
205
Conclusion
228
Glossary
236
Notes
241
Index
278
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Mary-Ellen Kelm is a Canada Research Chair in the Department of History at Simon Fraser University. Her previous books include Colonizing Bodies: Aboriginal Health and Healing in British Columbia. She is an avid animal trainer, competing in agility and obedience with her dog, Rusty. She lives in North Vancouver with her husband, Don, and spends her summers outdoors, hiking and paddling in British Columbia.

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