A Will to Survive

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Simon and Schuster, 1999 - Juvenile Fiction - 148 pages
1 Review
FRANK AND JOE ARE AN ACCIDENT WAITING TO HAPPEN WHEN THEY GO UNDERCOVER TO EXPOSE SABOTAGE

The shorewood Nature Center is a beautiful place -- to hike...to learn about local ecology...or to fall off a cliff. The Hardys learn that the hard way when they go undercover to investigate strange happenings on the grounds. In no time at all, they get jumped, smoked out, and booby-trapped.

The Hardys have never run from a challenge, and they're not about to start now. Someone will do anything to shut the center down. Frank and Joe have a clue why: there's a secret buried somewhere on the center's grounds -- a very valuable secret that's worth a lot more than the lives of two young detectives!

 

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Rare time in latter half of regular series where Callie had the active role, not Iola. Other notable exception #112 Demolition Mission ONLY TIME CALLIE BOUND AND GAGGED IN REGULAR SERIES. With Iola dead and Callie active in Casefiles, Iola usually got what action there was in the regular series for balance, most notable for her #133 Crimes in the Kennel, BOUND, GAGGED, TWICE. 

Contents

Trampled Cukes
11
The Secret in the Wall
22
Tangled Relations
33
Tracking the Scent
43
Targets of Suspicion
54
Piercing the Smoke Screen
63
A Deadt HangUp
72
The MillionDollar Log
82
Acre of Diamonds
92
A Busft Too Weafc
103
Taking Care of the Caretaker
111
ACrossedOffName
120
Battling the Flames
129
The Puzzle Decoded
143
Copyright

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About the author (1999)

Franklin W. Dixon Franklin W. Dixon is actually a pseudonym for any number of ghostwriters who have had the distinction of writing stories for the Hardy Boys series. The series was originally created by Edward Stratmeyer in 1926, the same mastermind of the Nancy Drew detective series, Tom Swift, the Rover Boys and other characters. While Stratmeyer created the outlines for the original series, it was Canadian writer Leslie McFarlane who breathed life to the stories and created the persona Franklin W. Dixon. McFarlane wrote for the series for over twenty years and is credited with success of the early collection of stories. As the series became more popular, it was pared down, the format changed and new ghostwriters added their own flavor to the stories. Part of the draw of the Hardy Boys is that as the authors changed, so to did the times and the story lines. While there is no one true author of the series, each ghostwriter can be given credit for enhancing the life of this series and never unveiling that there really is no Franklin W. Dixon.

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