A World Without Islam

Front Cover
Little, Brown, Jul 14, 2011 - Political Science - 336 pages
This extremely provocative and illuminating "what if" journey through history, geopolitics, and religion investigates whether there is something unique in Islam and its followers that breeds violence and conflict. Spanning the rise of Muhammad to the collapse of the Ottoman Empire to the present day, the book examines and analyzes the roots of terrorism, the conflicts in Israel and Chechnya, and the role of Islam in supporting and energizing the anti-imperial struggle.

Fuller's startling conclusion? Contrary to the claims of many of today's most respected politicians, thinkers, theologians, and soldiers, East-West relations in a world without Islam might not look vastly different from what we see today. And, thankfully, such recognition provides a map to a more peaceful future, making A WORLD WITHOUT ISLAM both a brilliant examination of the past and a visionary look forward.



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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Gregorio_Roth - LibraryThing

A World Without Islam shows that we often view others in a similar fashion that the blind man viewed the Elephant. We may see accurately one aspect of Islam, but fall short in seeing Islam as a whole ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - hadden - LibraryThing

Interesting concept. However, much of the influence of Turkish policies and influence in Islamic countries was ignored. The concept is simplified as trouble between East and West, and not over religion. I didn't buy his argument, but it was expressed well. Read full review

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About the author (2011)

Graham E. Fuller is a former vice chairman of the National Intelligence Council at the CIA, in charge of long-range strategic forecasting. He is an adjunct professor of history at Simon Fraser University and the author of numerous books about the Middle East.

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