A Yankee Engineer Abroad: Part Ii: the East

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AuthorHouse, Dec 7, 2011 - Travel - 496 pages

This book is a transcription of a recently discovered manuscript of a Grand Tour taken by a clasically educated American engineer in the years 1855 through 1857.

 

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Contents

I
2
II
18
III
46
IV
64
V
80
VI
106
VII
124
VIII
144
XVI
302
XVII
322
XVIII
344
XIX
362
XX
378
Weather Chart
390
MAPS
404
Translations of Selected Locations
412

IX
164
X
184
XII
222
XIII
244
XIV
266
XV
288
Photograph Album
414
OBITUARY
450
SOURCES
454
Index
456
Copyright

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About the author (2011)

The following obituary and preface are taken from the book "Notes on the History of the Church" by Frederick Hubbard, privately printed, and published in 1896 by Thomas Whittaker, New York.

Obituary.

HUBBARD. — In New York City, on October 30, 1895, of consumption, FREDERICK HUBBARD. Funeral services at Trinity Church, All Saints’ Day. Burial at Utica, N.Y.

FREDERICK HUBBARD.

Entered into the rest of Paradise, at No. 20 Union Square, New York City, October 30, 1895, FREDERICK HUBBARD. In close of a completed life, he has left the memory of religion, pure and undefiled, to which his many friends may point with affectionate reverence. Born June 20, 1817, in Hamilton, Madison County, of Thomas H. and Phœbe Hubbard, his boyhood days were passed in Utica. Graduating at Hamilton College in 1836, he adopted the profession of engineering and was for many years connected with the laying out of the early railroads of the country, especially the Hudson River, Erie, Michigan Southern and Northern Indiana. For two years he was engaged in the erection of Harlem Bridge. Retiring from business some twenty-five years ago, he travelled extensively and occupied himself with classical reading and scientific research. Of positive conviction in religion, he brought to bear his wide erudition especially on Biblical studies. He long ago identified himself with Trinity Church, New York, where he was a regular worshipper and devout communicant, and entered into the practical work of helping in her many activities. For years he conducted a Bible-class and gave himself to interesting young men in the guilds. Through his liberal gifts he was practically identified with many parishes throughout the country. Especially sympathetic with the sick and needy, he endowed beds in St. Luke’s Hospital and St. Mary’s Home; but so unostentatious was he in his charities, almost to secrecy, that their extent can only be guessed at. Simple in his demeanor, yet choice in his tastes, his life moved quietly on without parade, content in the satisfaction of doing good. In that great day of reward many will rise up to call him blessed, and, though he has passed from the field of his rich activities here, his works do follow him.

The funeral took place on All Saints’ Day from Trinity Church, New York. The interment was on Saturday in the Hubbard family lot, in Forest Hill Cemetery, Utica.

E. B. S.

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