A Yearbook of Holidays & Observances: A Multicultural Perspective of Celebrations in the United States

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DIANE Publishing, Jul 1, 1990 - Social Science - 52 pages
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Provides insight into the beliefs and values of different peoples, primarily people of color, by looking at the holidays and celebrations (religious and nonreligious) which play an important part in their lives. Following a month-by-month format, the publication looks at holidays, which mainstream America consider traditional, through the perspectives of women and people of color and provides info. about holidays which are of particular importance to these groups. Includes holidays of: Chinese, African-American, Islamic, Hispanic, Jewish, Native American, and other celebrations. Includes info. on lunar, solar, and scientifically manipulated calendars.
 

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Page x - And when this happens when we allow freedom to ring — when we let it ring from every village and hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics — will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last, free at last; thank God Almighty, we are free at last.
Page 4 - Lift ev'ry voice and sing, Till earth and heaven ring, Ring with the harmonies of Liberty; Let our rejoicing rise High as the list'ning skies, Let it resound loud as the rolling sea — Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought — us; Facing the rising sun of our new day begun, Let us march on till victory — is won.
Page 28 - Indians; their lands and property shall never be taken from them without their consent; and in their property rights and liberty they shall never be invaded or disturbed, unless in just and lawful wars authorized by Congress; but laws founded in justice and humanity shall, from time to time, be made, for preventing wrongs being done to them, and for preserving peace and friendship with them.
Page 30 - They had for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations, and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect; and that the Negro might justly and lawfully be reduced to slavery for his benefit.
Page 25 - I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the colour of their skin but by the content of their character.
Page 25 - I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident; that all men are created equal.
Page 25 - What treaty that the whites have kept has the red man broken? Not one. What treaty that the white man ever made with us have they kept? Not one.
Page 25 - When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir. This note was a promise that all men, yes, black men as well as white men, would be guaranteed the unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
Page 25 - It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check: a check which has come back marked "insufficient funds.
Page 43 - We have never dreamt of incorporating into our Union any but the Caucasian race— the free white race. To incorporate Mexico, would be the very first instance of the kind, of incorporating an Indian race; for more than half of the Mexicans are Indians, and the other is composed chiefly of mixed tribes.

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