A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume 3

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R. Jennings, and J. Major, 1829 - Bibliography
 

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Page 273 - On quitting the church and passing through the last court, or smaller quadrangle, we came to the outer walls; and leaving them, we discerned below, the horses, carriage, and valet, waiting to receive us. Our amiable host and his Benedictine brethren determined to walk a little way down the hill, to see us fairly seated, and ready to start. I entreated and remonstrated that this might not be, but in vain. On reaching the carriage, we all shook hands very cordially together; but certainly I pressed...
Page 264 - He slept here, and we entertained him, the next day, with the best dejcune d la fourchette which we could afford. He seemed well satisfied with his reception ; but I own that I was glad when he left us. Strangers to arms, in this tranquil retreat, and visited only, as you may now visit us, for the purpose of peaceful hospitality, it agitated us extremely to come in contact with warriors and chieftains. — Observe yonder...
Page 264 - Look on the prospect around you,' said the abbot : 'it is unbounded. On yon opposite wooded heights, on tlie other side of the Danube, we all saw, from these very windows, the fire and smoke of the advanced guard of the French army, in contest with the Austrians, upon Bonaparte's first advance towards Vienna. The French emperor himself took possession of this monastery. He slept here, and we entertained him, the next day, with the best dejcune d la fourchette which we could afford.
Page 242 - To our admiration the organ burst forth with a power of intonation (every stop being opened) such as I had never heard exceeded. As there were only a few present, the sounds were necessarily increased by being reverberated from every part of the building ; and for a moment it seemed as if the very dome would have been unroofed and the sides burst asunder. We could not hear a word that was spoken ; when, in a few succeeding seconds, the diapason stop only was opened . . . and how sweet and touching...
Page 91 - DIBDIN In ancient times — that is to say, upward of three centuries ago — the city of Augsburg was probably the most populous and consequential in the kingdom of Bavaria. It was the principal residence of the noblesse, and the great mart of commerce. Dukes, barons, nobles of every rank and degree, became domiciled here. A thousand blue and white flags streamed from the tops of castellated mansions, and fluttered along the then almost impregnable ramparts. It was also not less remarkable for the...
Page 268 - ... entered the saloon for dinner. It was a large, light, and lofty room ; the ceiling was covered with paintings of allegorical subjects in fresco, descriptive of the advantages of piety and learning. We sat down at a high table — precisely as in the halls at Oxford — to a plentiful and elegant repast. We were cheerful even to loud mirth; and the smallness of the party, compared with the size of the hall, caused the sounds of our voices to be reverberated from every quarter. Behind me stood...
Page 424 - It may be as well briefly to notice the two churches — St. Sebald and St. Lawrence. The former was within a stone's throw of our inn. Above the door of the western front is a remarkably fine crucifix of wood — placed, however, in too deep a recess — said to be by Veit Stoss. The head is of a very fine form, and the countenance has an expression of the most acute and intense feeling. A crown of thorns is twisted around the brow. But this figure, as well as the whole of the outside and inside...
Page 434 - ... the tombstone of the founder of the monastery, upon the site of which the present Citadel was built, bears the date of 1296. This tombstone is very perfect; lying in a loose, unconnected manner, as you enter the chapel; the chapel itself having a crypt-like appearance. This latter is very small. From the suite of apartments in the older parts of the Citadel, there is a most extensive and uninterrupted view of the surrounding country, which is rather flat. At the distance of about nine miles,...
Page 413 - ... the French in 1809. But these are, comparatively, every-day objects. A much more interesting source of observation, to my mind, were the very few existing relics of the once celebrated monastery of St. Emmeram — and a great portion of the remains of another old monastery, called St. James — which latter may indeed be designated the College of the Jacobites; as the few members who inhabit it were the followers of the house and fortunes of the Pretender, James Stuart. The Monastery or Abbey...
Page 411 - Cathedral, surrounded by booths—it being fairtime — was, of course, the great object of my attention. In short, I saw enough within an hour t convince me that I was visiting a large, curious, and well-peopled town; replete with antiquities, and including several of the time of the Romans, to whom it was necessarily a very important station. Ratisbon is said to contain a population of...

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