A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume 3

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Robert Jennings, and John Major, 1829 - Bibliography
 

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Page 268 - ... entered the saloon for dinner. It was a large, light, and lofty room ; the ceiling was covered with paintings of allegorical subjects in fresco, descriptive of the advantages of piety and learning. We sat down at a high table — precisely as in the halls at Oxford — to a plentiful and elegant repast. We were cheerful even to loud mirth; and the smallness of the party, compared with the size of the hall, caused the sounds of our voices to be reverberated from every quarter. Behind me stood...
Page 264 - Look on the prospect around you,' said the abbot : 'it is unbounded. On yon opposite wooded heights, on tlie other side of the Danube, we all saw, from these very windows, the fire and smoke of the advanced guard of the French army, in contest with the Austrians, upon Bonaparte's first advance towards Vienna. The French emperor himself took possession of this monastery. He slept here, and we entertained him, the next day, with the best dejcune d la fourchette which we could afford.
Page 242 - To our admiration the organ burst forth with a power of intonation (every stop being opened) such as I had never heard exceeded. As there were only a few present, the sounds were necessarily increased by being reverberated from every part of the building ; and for a moment it seemed as if the very dome would have been unroofed and the sides burst asunder. We could not hear a word that was spoken ; when, in a few succeeding seconds, the diapason stop only was opened . . . and how sweet and touching...
Page 91 - DIBDIN In ancient times — that is to say, upward of three centuries ago — the city of Augsburg was probably the most populous and consequential in the kingdom of Bavaria. It was the principal residence of the noblesse, and the great mart of commerce. Dukes, barons, nobles of every rank and degree, became domiciled here. A thousand blue and white flags streamed from the tops of castellated mansions, and fluttered along the then almost impregnable ramparts. It was also not less remarkable for the...
Page 440 - Well, then, shall I say forty guineas for this splendid work? — Twenty? — Ten? — Consider, gentlemen, this most magnificent " And, after having exhausted all the flowers of auction-room oratory in its praise, he added, with a sigh which seemed to come from the very bottom of his — pulpit, " Well, then, shall I say six?" Here was a pause which, to us, was highly gratifying. " Five,
Page 65 - ... presented themselves in the open fretwork of the ornaments, and finding, as we continued to ascend, that the inhabitants and dwelling houses of Ulm diminished gradually in size. At length we gained the summit, which is surrounded by a parapet wall of some three or four feet in height. We paused a minute, to recover our breath, and to look at the prospect which surrounded us. The town, at our feet, looked like the metropolis of Laputa. Yet the high ground, by which we had descended into the town...
Page 264 - He slept here, and we entertained him, the next day, with the best dejeune <i la fourchette which we could afford. He seemed well satisfied with his reception ; but I own that I was glad when he left us. Strangers to arms, in this tranquil retreat, and visited only, as you may now visit us, for the purpose of peaceful hospitality, it agitated us extremely to come in contact with warriors and chieftains. — Observe yonder...
Page 368 - King of Hungary, cut a conspicuous and very respectable figure. I fear it will be now impracticable to see the arsenal as it ought to be seen. It is now approaching mid-day, and we are walking toward the terrace in front of the Great Belvidere Palace, built by the immortal Eugene* in the year 1724, as a summer residence. Probably no spot could have been selected with better .judgment for the residence of a Prince — who wished to enjoy, almost at the same moment, the charms of the country with the...
Page 12 - What a lesson for dabblers in criticism and readers of reviews ! He said that he was first put upon collations of Greek MSS. by our Dr. Musgrave, for his edition of " Euripides ;" and that he dated from that circumstance his first and early love of classical research. This attachment had increased upon him as he became older ; had " grown with his growth, and strengthened with his strength," and had induced him to grapple with the unsettled, and in parts difficult texts of Oppian, Epictelut, and...
Page 115 - ... what shall I say of these ; all the fruit of the munificent spirit of Maximilian ? Truly I would pass over the whole with an indifferent eye to gaze upon a simple altar of pure gold, the sole ornament of the prison of the unfortunate Mary Queen of Scots, which Pope Leo the Eleventh gave to William the Fifth Elector of Bavaria.

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