A Bill to Promote Mendicancy: Facts and Figures Showing that the South Does Not Need Federal Aid for Her Schools. [A Reprint of Editorial Articles Published in the New York Evening Post During the Years 1886 and 1887.] ...

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Evening Post Publishing Company, 1888 - Education - 27 pages
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Page 5 - A very striking depression took place as soon as the fund became productive and the income began to be distributed. Before that period schools had been maintained at least six months, and at most nearly the whole year, according to the size of the district. After, and not long after, this new source of income was opened, the usual length of schools was reduced to only three months, or just the time that this fund would maintain the schools. The sums which came as gratuities relieved people of the...
Page 10 - Be it resolved. That our Senators and Representatives be earnestly requested to do all in their power to secure the passage of the bill now pending in the House of Representatives to organize the Signal Service of the Army.
Page 5 - State, is $10.31, so that the fund now furnishes about eight per cent, of the total cost. In those towns and cities where the people insist upon good schools, no reliance is placed upon these permanent funds. Indeed, the history of our State shows conclusively that at the time when the fund was most productive...
Page 5 - The average expense of educating each of these persons throughout the State is $10.31, so that the fund now furnishes about eight per cent, of the total cost. In those towns and cities where the people insist upon good schools, no reliance is placed upon these permanent funds. Indeed, the history of our...
Page 26 - ... they grow up. Advocates of the Blair bill always insist that it is not, because the South does not have as good schools as cities in the North have.
Page 5 - Western lands, yielded an income last year of $120,855, which amounts to eighty cents for each person of the school age. The average expense of educating each of these persons throughout the State, is $10.31, so that the fund now furnishes about eight per cent, of the total cost. In those towns and cities where the people insist upon good school...
Page 4 - The plea in favor of the bill, as we have said, is plausible, but we believe that it is fallacious, because it takes a short-sighted view of the future. Illiteracy is a bad thing for a community, but it is not the worst thing. It is important for the South that its present ignorance should be dispelled as soon as possible, but that is not the most important thing for the South. The vital element of any success that is worth achieving in this world is self-reliance.
Page 10 - It was evident that no increase in the State appropriation for public education would be voted as long as there was the least prospect of aid from Washington. There was deliberate determination to enjoy the easy position of a beneficiary of the National Government to the fullest possible extent rather than to be independent and support a good school system by Its own unaided efforts.
Page 5 - Northern supporters on this point were summed up as follows : "An appropriation for education in the Southern States is not a gift of charity; it is a payment of a debt due by justice. The nation shares in the responsibility for slavery. It is wholly responsible for emancipation and enfranchisement. If the South had enfranchised the blacks, we might leave the South to educate them ; but in putting the ballot in one hand we obliged ourselves to put the school-book into the other."10...
Page 26 - Monitor might have shown that a larger percentage of t he children of school age are enrolled in the public schools of some Southern States than in New Hampshire, while even South Carolina, which has the largest proportion of negroes, falls only a trifle behind New Hampshire in this respect. The latest reports of the Superintendents of Education in the Southern States teem with proofs that outside help is not needed, a few of which must be cited.

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