A Biographical Dictionary of the Qin, Former Han and Xin Periods, 221 BC - AD 24

Front Cover
Brill, 2000 - Biography & Autobiography - 837 pages
0 Reviews
This is a unique and conclusive reference work about the 6,000 individual men and women known to us from China's formative first empires. Over decennia Michael Loewe (Cambridge, UK) has painstakingly collected all biographical information available. Not only those are dealt with who set the literary forms and intellectual background of traditional China, such as writers, scholars, historians and philosophers, but also those officials who administered the empire, and the military leaders who fought in civil warfare or with China's neighbours. The work draws on primary historical sources as interpreted by Chinese, Japanese and Western scholars and as supplemented by archaeological finds and inscriptions. By devoting extensive entries to each of the emperors the author provides the reader with the necessary historical context and gives insight into the dynastic disputes and their far-reaching consequences. No comparable work exists for this important period of Chinese history. Without exaggeration a real must for historians of both China and other cultures.

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Biographical list
1
Titles of officials
756
Genealogical tables
769
Imodi and his descendants
771
Wendi Jingdi and their descendants
772
Wudis Empress Wei
773
Wudis minor consorts Li Furen Zhao Jieyu Wang Furen Li Yi
774
The imperial succession Xuandi to Pingdi
775
Mafor administrative divisions
779
MAPS
780
Maps
806
The Qin Empire
807
The emergent kingdoms 210202 BC
808
The Han Empire 195 BC
809
The Han Empire 163 BC
810
Regional Units AD 2
812

Huo Guang and his relatives
776
Wang Mangs family
777
The Fu family
778
List of works cited
813
Qin Han and Xin emperors
823
Copyright

Other editions - View all

About the author (2000)

Michael Loewe, Ph.D. (1963) in Chinese Studies, London, was a Lecturer in Chinese Studies, Cambridge from 1963 to 1990, and a Visiting Professor at Harvard and Chicago. He has published widely on the dynastic, religious and institutional history of China's early empires.

Bibliographic information