A book of ballads from the German

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J. McGlashan, 1848 - Poetry - 128 pages
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Page 41 - WINGS ! to bear me over Mountain and vale away ; Wings ! to bathe my spirit In morning's sunny ray. Wings ! that I may hover At morn above the sea ; Wings ! thro' life to bear me And death triumphantly.
Page 3 - In his arms took up the Spirit, To heal of all its woe. " In gentle accents speaking Full of sweet peace and love ' Come with me, hapless Spirit, To Heaven's bright realms above. " But the mournful Spirit answered, ' I'd pass a life of pain, Could I revisit only The bright green earth again. " ' A thousand years of penance In torture I would dwell, To see for one brief instant Him whom I loved so well.' " A glance of tender pity In the Angel's eye had birth, As he bore the weeping Spirit Again to...
Page 2 - A spirit once lay sighing Beyond that dim unknown, Where through long years of penance The souls of mortals groan. " ' And still,' sighed the poor spirit, ' A thousand years of pain I'd live, could I behold once more Mine own dear love again.' " From heaven an Angel floating, With wings as white as snow, In his arms took up the Spirit, To heal of all its woe. " In gentle accents speaking Full of sweet peace and love ' Come with me, hapless Spirit, To Heaven's bright realms above. " But the mournful...
Page 5 - Then sighed the Spirit, weeping, ' I cannot enter there ; A thousand years of penance 'Tis yet my lot to bear.
Page 4 - When they near'd the ancient lindens, Where the pleasant waters flow, There sat her heart's beloved, But he loved another now. " For 'neath the waving shadows Of their ancient trysting-place, A gentle maid reclining, Was locked in love's embrace.
Page 50 - And they come to a small hostel, Where, in the time of old. Rich wine of Asmanshauser, The good Frau Wirthin sold. " We know the juice is famous, Which from thy grape is press'd ; Come, then — a flagon give us, Frau Wirthin! of thy best.
Page 114 - Thus they clatter, and chatter, and frolic in saal, Amid benches and tables all prancing ; Till the banqueting-room offers welcome to all, And supper succeeds to the dancing. The dainties so magic, are sliced so fine ; With roebuck, and wild-fowl, and fish from the Rhine...
Page 51 - O'er her couch the funeral veil, Bent down, and kiss'd the maiden Upon her lips so pale : ' To thee the dearest homage I gave, which heart can pay ; Stern Death may take thy beauty, But not my love — away 1' " This poem is illustrated by one of the best and most characteristic engravings in the volume.
Page 115 - But here let us sing of what later took place, When the revelry ceased and the noise ; How the pageant, devised by the frolicsome race, The Count now adopts and enjoys. So the trumpet is heard, with its musical strain— A splendid procession moves over the plain, With chariots and horsemen, a numberless train ; All cordially joining, so happy and gay, To honour the nuptials we witness to-day.
Page 112 - ... servant attending — your rooms in sad plight; But patiently wait the return of daylight: In the meantime the moonbeams will show you where best, On some straw as a couch you may lie down and rest." There, seeking repose, half asleep as he lay, Something moves about under his bed; Perhaps a starved rat may be rustling his way — For a long time a stranger to bread : When, lo ! issues forth a diminutive wight — An elegant Fay in a circle of light— Who, with action so graceful, and speech...

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