A Book of Remembrance

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J. B. Lippincott, 1901 - London (England) - 389 pages
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Page 224 - O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, which killest the prophets, and stonest them that are sent unto thee; how often would I have gathered thy children together, as a hen doth gather her brood ST. LUKE 14 under her wings, and ye would not!
Page 18 - I have in a private capacity given just cause of offense to any one whatever,) yet they are enemies, and very bitter ones; and you must expect their enmity will extend in some degree to you, so that your slightest indiscretions will be magnified into crimes, in order the more sensibly to wound and afflict me. It is, therefore, the more necessary for you to be extremely circumspect in all your behaviour, that no advantage may be given to their malevolence.
Page 18 - My dear child, the natural prudence and goodness of heart God has blest you with make it less necessary for me to be particular in giving you advice. I shall therefore only say, that the more attentively dutiful and tender you are towards your good mamma, the more you will recommend yourself to me. But why should I mention me...
Page 18 - Go constantly to church, whoever preaches ; the act of devotion in the common prayer book is your principal business there, and if properly attended to, will do more towards amending the heart than Sermons generally can do. For they were composed by men of much greater piety and wisdom than our common composers of sermons can pretend to be...
Page 18 - We got down here at sunset, having taken in more live stock at Newcastle, with some other things we wanted. Our good friends, Mr. Galloway, Mr. Wharton, and Mr. James, came with me in the ship from Chester to Newcastle and went ashore there. It was kind to favour me with their good company as far as they could. The affectionate leave taken of me by so many friends at Chester was very endearing. God bless them and all Pennsylvania.
Page 24 - I am happy to have it in my power to tell you that the sums given by the good women of Philadelphia, for the benefit of the army, have been much greater than could be expected, and given with so much cheerfulness, and so many blessings, that it was rather a pleasing than a painful task to call for them. I write to claim you as a Philadelphian, and shall think myself honored in your donation.
Page 19 - ... preachers you dislike, for the discourse is often much better than the man, as sweet and clear waters come through very dirty earth. I am the more particular on this head, as you seemed to express a little before I came away some inclination to leave our church, which I would not have you do. For the rest, I would only recommend to you in my absence, to acquire those useful accomplishments, arithmetic and book-keeping. This you might do with ease, if you would resolve not to see company on the...
Page 375 - After frightful nightmares all night, in which he had struggled against specters who threatened to carry him off to hell, he came to rest in my studio. His nightmares reminded me of the skeleton scene, and I told him of it. His eyes never left my piano, and he asked: 'Have you a skeleton?
Page 375 - Zicm, in the Rue Lepic, and was suggested by a story told him by the 'artist. M. Ziem had been one evening to the studio of Prince Edmond de Polignac with Compte de Ludre and M. de Valdrome. There was a skeleton in the studio, and among other Bohemian whimsicalities Prince Edmond placed the skeleton on a chair in front of the piano and guided its fingers over the keys. ' 'Some time later on,
Page 19 - ... amending the heart than sermons generally can do. For they were composed by men of much greater piety and wisdom, than our common composers of sermons can pretend to be; and therefore I wish you would never miss the prayer days ; yet I do not mean you should despise sermons, even of the preachers you dislike, for the discourse is often much better than the man, as sweet and clear waters come through very dirty earth. I am the more particular on this head, as you seemed to express a little before...

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