A Book of the Running Brook: And of Still Waters

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0. Judd Company, 1886 - Fishing - 129 pages
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Page xi - Hath not old custom made this life more sweet Than that of painted pomp ? Are not these woods More free from peril than the envious court ? Here feel we but the penalty of Adam, The seasons' difference, as the icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's wind, Which, when it bites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say " This is no flattery: these are counsellors 10 That feelingly persuade me what I am.
Page xi - The seasons' difference : as the icy fang And churlish chiding of the winter's wind, Which when it bites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold, I smile and say, This is no flattery : these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am. Sweet are the uses of adversity ; Which, like the toad, ugly and venomous, Wears yet a precious jewel in his head ; And this our life, exempt from public haunt, Finds tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, Sermons in stones, and good in...
Page xi - The seasons' difference ; as, the icy fang, And churlish chiding of the winter's wind; Which when it bites and blows upon my body, Even till I shrink with cold, I smile, and say,— This is no flattery : these are counsellors That feelingly persuade me what I am.
Page 70 - She was a gordian shape of dazzling hue. Vermilion-spotted, golden, green, and blue: Striped like a zebra, freckled like a pard, Eyed like a peacock, and all crimson barr'd: And full of silver moons, that, as she breathed, Dissolv'd, or brighter shone, or interwreathed Their lustres with the gloomier tapestries So rainbow-sided, touch'd with miseries.
Page 10 - Hampton the young eels have been seen to ascend the large posts of the flood gates, in order to make their way when the gates have been shut longer than usual. Those which die, stick to the posts ; others, which get a little higher, meet with the same fate, until at last a sufficient layer of them is formed to enable the rest to overcome the difficulty of the passage.
Page 86 - Scholar, I once heard one say, ' I envy not him that eats better meat than I do, nor him that is richer, or that wears better clothes than I do; I envy nobody but him, and him only, that catches more fish than I do.
Page 7 - For a long time the most extraordinary theories were accepted regarding the birth of young eels. Aristotle believed they sprang from the mud, wherein he was not far wrong, as eels deposit their spawn in mud and sand ; Pliny maintained that young eels developed from fragments separated from the parents...
Page 103 - Observing it attentively, we found that it consisted of a circular assemblage of minnows; their heads all met in a centre, and their tails, diverging at equal distances, and being elevated above their heads, gave them the appearance of a flower half blown.
Page 32 - ... by the ridge of the fresshe Heeryng; and thenne put the lyne of your hoke in after, and drawe the hoke into the cheke of the fresshe Heeryng...
Page 70 - His cuirass of scales is formed of a lovely bronze, with transverse bars of dark green bronze, while the whole is shaded with a lovely peacock iridescence. His fins are coloured with a lovely tinge of red, such as we may sometimes see in the glass of very old church windows, or occasionally in Salviati's beautiful glass. Artists would do well to study the colouring of the perch. They will not find such brilliancy of colour or such a combination of tints in any flower.

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