A Brief Account of Radio-activity

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D. C. Heath, 1917 - Radioactivity - 54 pages
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Page 28 - ... the spectrum tube V, and the nature of the gases present determined spectroscopically. It was found that two days after the introduction of the emanation, the spectrum showed the yellow line of helium, and after six days the whole helium spectrum was observed. In order to be certain that the helium had not diffused through the thin walls of the tube A, the emanation was pumped out and helium substituted. No trace of helium could be observed in the vacuum tube after several days, showing that...
Page 28 - ... from the emanation was clearly seen by the scintillations produced at some distance on a zinc sulphide screen. The glass tube A was surrounded by a cylindrical glass tube T, and a small spectrum tube V was attached to it. The tube T was completely exhausted to a charcoal vacuum By means of the mercury column H the gases in the tube T could at any time be compressed into the spectrum tube V, and the nature of the gases present determined spectroscopically. It was found that two days after the...
Page 12 - If these are not available, the system can be charged by means of a rod of sealing-wax. The charging rod CC- is then removed from contact with the gold-leaf system. The rods P and C and the cylinder are then connected with earth.
Page 32 - Br. Arch. 17, 259 ) — It yet remains to be determined whether these crystals are not hydrated sulphantimoniate of potassium. F. SULPHANTIMONIATE OF POTASSIUM. — This compound is likewise a kind of Liver of Antimony. — 1. It is prepared by a method similar to that used in the preparation of sulphantimonite of potassium, but with the addition of a sufficient quantity of sulphur, previous to fusion. — 2. By fusing tersulphide of antimony with a mixture of bisulphate of potash and charcoal. —...
Page 37 - No doubt the positively charged centre of the atom is a complicated system in movement, consisting in part of charged helium and hydrogen atoms. It would appear as if the positively charged atoms of matter attract one another at very small distances, for otherwise it is difficult to see how the component parts at the centre are held together.
Page 28 - ... thin cylinder of lead is placed over the emanation tube, since the helium fired into the lead diffuses out more rapidly than from glass. A still more definite proof of the identity of the a particle with the helium atom was obtained by removing the outer glass cylinder and placing a cylinder of sheet lead over the emanation tube in the open air. Helium was always detected- in the lead after it had remained several hours over the thin tube containing a large quantity of emanation. In order to...
Page 27 - ... capillary tube B, was sufficiently thin to allow the a particles from the emanation and its products to escape ; but sufficiently strong to withstand atmospheric pressure. The thickness of the glass wall was, in most cases, less than 1/100 mm. On introducing the emanation into the tube, the escape of the a particles from the emanation was clearly seen by the scintillations produced at some distance on a zinc sulphide screen. The glass tube A was surrounded by a cylindrical glass tube T, and a...
Page iii - ... Changes in Radio-active Bodies, Nature of the • Alpha Particle, Structure of the Atom, Radio-activity and the Chemical Theory- The work is based upon the writings of Rutherford, Soddy, and JJ Thomson, and should prove of value not only to students of general chemistry and radio-activity, but also to busy men in other branches of science who wish to know something of radio-activity and have scant leisure in which to read the larger treatises.
Page 27 - A about 1'5 cms. long. This tube, which was sealed to a larger Fig. 29. capillary tube B, was sufficiently thin to allow the a particles from the emanation and its products to escape ; but sufficiently strong to withstand atmospheric pressure. The thickness of the glass wall was, in most cases, less than 1/100...
Page 28 - ... was surrounded by a cylindrical glass tube T, and a small spectrum tube V was attached to it. The tube T was completely exhausted to a charcoal vacuum By means of the mercury column H the gases in the tube T could at any time be compressed into the spectrum tube V, and the nature of the gases present determined spectroscopically. It was found that two days after the introduction of the emanation, the spectrum showed the yellow line of helium, and after six days the whole helium spectrum was observed....

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