A Brief Compend of American Agriculture

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Saxton & Miles, 1846 - Agriculture - 437 pages
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Page 398 - Who hath sent out the wild ass free? Or who hath loosed the bands of the wild ass? Whose house I have made the wilderness, And the barren land his dwellings. He scorneth the multitude of the city, Neither regardeth he the crying of the driver. The range of the mountains is his pasture, And he searcheth after every green thing.
Page 393 - The moisture which that little takes up can be easily removed : both the skin and the hair can be made perfectly dry before evaporation begins, or proceeds so far as to deprive the legs of their heat. It is the cold produced by evaporation that does all the mischief.
Page 336 - The under jaw, or chap, fine and thin ; the ears tolerably wide, and well covered with wool, and the forehead also, and the whole space between the ears well protected by it, as a defence against the fly.
Page 202 - I then make a moderate fire directly under the caldron, until the scum is all raised, then skim it off clean, taking care not to let it boil so as to rise in the kettle before I have done skimming it; I then sugar it off, leaving it so damp that it will drain a little. I let it remain in the kettle until it is well granulated. I then put it into boxes made smallest at the bottom, that will hold from...
Page 209 - Kiln-drying. — The size and mode of constructing the kiln may be varied to suit circumstances. The following is a very cheap plan, and sufficient to dry one ton of roots at a time : Place four strong posts in the ground, twelve feet apart one way, and eighteen the other ; the front two fourteen feet high, and the...
Page 387 - ... and the outside raised and lowered ; and sometimes one operation has succeeded, and sometimes the contrary ; and there was no point so involved in obscurity, or so destitute of principles to guide the practitioner. The most successful remedy, and that which in the great majority of cases supersedes all others, is Mr. Turner's shoe, of equal thickness from heel to toe, and having but one nail, and that near the toe on the inside of the shoe ; care being taken that the shoe shall not extend beyond...
Page 201 - I boil through the day, taking care not to have any thing in the kettle that will give color to the sap, and to keep it well skimmed. At night I leave fire enough under the kettle to boil the sap nearly or quite to syrup by the next morning; I then take it out of the kettle and strain it through a flannel cloth into a tub, if it is sweet enough; if not, I put it...
Page 48 - Organic matter containing nitrogen, including urate of ammonia, and capable of affording from 8 to 17 per cent, of ammonia by slow change in the soil 50 Water 11. Phosphate of lime 25...
Page 337 - ... the forelegs straight from the breast to the foot, not bending inward at the knee, and standing far apart both before and behind ; the hocks having a direction rather outward, and the twist or the meeting of the thighs behind being particularly full ; the bones fine, yet having no appearance of weakness, and of a speckled or dark color; the belly well defended with wool, coming down before and behind the knee and the hock; the wool short, close, curled, and fine, and free from spiry, projecting...
Page 208 - ... across the under side.) On these spread the roots about two inches thick for drying in the sun. Carry the platforms to a convenient place, not far from the house, and place them side by side, in rows east and west, and with their ends north and south, leaving room to walk between the rows. Elevate the south ends of the platforms about eighteen inches, and the north ends about six inches from the ground, putting poles or sticks to support them — this will greatly facilitate drying. After the...

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