A Brief History of the Age of Steam: The Power that Drove the Industrial Revolution

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Carroll & Graf Publishers, 2007 - History - 370 pages
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In 1710 an obscure Devon ironmonger Thomas Newcomen invented a machine with a pump driven by coal, used to extract water from mines. Over the next two hundred years the steam engine would be at the heart of the industrial revolution that changed the fortunes of nations. Passionately written and insightful, A Brief History of the Age of Steam reveals not just the lives of the great inventors such as Watts, Stephenson and Brunel but also tells a narrative that reaches from the US to the expansion of China, India, and South America and shows how the steam engine changed the world.

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Contents

The Transport Paradigm
1
Transport by Land and its Limitations
18
The Domination of Sea Traffic
37
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Thomas Crump used to teach Anthropology at Amsterdam University. He is the author of A Brief History of Science, The Anthropology of Numbers and Asia Pacific: A History of Empire and Conflict.

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