A Brief Statement of the Rights of the Seneca Indians in the State of New York: To Their Lands in that State, with Decisions Relative Thereto by the State and United States Courts, and Extracts from United States Laws, &c

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W.H. Pile, printer, 1872 - Allegheny Indian Reservation (N.Y.) - 26 pages
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Page 16 - That no purchase or grant of lands, or of any title or claim thereto, from any Indians, or nation or tribe of Indians, within the bounds of the United States, shall be of any validity, in law or equity, unless the same be made by a treaty or convention entered into pursuant to the constitution.
Page 8 - to the government, sovereignty and jurisdiction" of the lands in dispute. New York, on its part, ceded "to the said commonwealth of Massachusetts, and to the use of the commonwealth, their grantees and the heirs and assigns of such grantees forever, the right of pre-emption of the soil from the native Indians, and all their estate, right, title and property (the right and title of government, sovereignty and jurisdiction...
Page 6 - So, too, with respect to the concomitant principle, that the Indian inhabitants are to be considered merely as occupants, to be protected, indeed, while in peace, in the possession of their lands, but to be deemed incapable of transferring the absolute title to others.
Page 15 - Congress, and whether this proceeding under it has deprived the relators of property or rights secured to them by any treaty or act of Congress. The statute in question is a police regulation for the protection of the Indians from intrusion of the white people, and to preserve the peace. It is the dictate of a prudent and just policy. Notwithstanding the peculiar relation which these Indian nations hold to the Government of the United States, the...
Page 10 - Nation, nor any of the Six Nations, or of their Indian friends residing thereon and united with them, in the free use and enjoyment thereof; but it shall remain theirs until they choose to sell the same to the people of the United States, who have the right to purchase.
Page 16 - The agent of any State who may be present at any treaty held with Indians under the authority of the United States, in the presence and with the approbation of the commissioner...
Page 15 - Indians from intrusion of the white people, and to preserve the peace. It is the dictate of a prudent and just policy. Notwithstanding the peculiar relation which these Indian nations hold to the government of the United States, the State of New York had the power of a sovereign over their persons and property, so far as it was necessary to preserve the peace of the commonwealth, and protect these feeble and helpless bands from imposition and intrusion. The power of a State to make such regulations...
Page 10 - The United States acknowledge the lands reserved to the Oneida, Onondaga, and Cayuga Nations, in their respective treaties with the state of New York, and called their reservations, to be their property; and the United States will never claim the same, nor disturb them, or either of the Six Nations, nor their Indian friends residing thereon and united with them, in the free use and enjoyment thereof: but the said reservations shall remain theirs...
Page 5 - By the treaty which concluded the war of our revolution, Great Britain relinquished all claim, not only to the government, but to the ' proprietary and territorial rights of the United States,' whose boundaries were fixed in the second article. By this treaty the powers of government, and the right to soil, which had previously been in Great Britain, passed definitely to these states.
Page 8 - The Commonwealth of Massachusetts may grant the right of preemption of the whole or any part of the said lands and territories to any person or persons who by virtue of such grant shall have good right to extinguish by purchase the claims of the native Indians...

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