A Canoe Voyage Up the Minnay Sotor: With an Account of the Lead and Copper Deposits in Wisconsin ; of the Gold Region in the Cherokee Country ; and Sketches of the Popular Manners, &c, Volume 2

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Richard Bentley, 1847 - Cherokee Indians
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Page 93 - This considerably changed the current of our thoughts, and materially impaired the beauty of the prospect. Not being disposed to express all we felt, we reluctantly took to the woods again, along the margin of the lake, in the hope to stumble upon some one or other. Night was gradually drawing her veil over every thing, and it became rather doubtful whether we should not have — in the language of backwoodsmen — to camp out. Keeping, therefore, all my visions of fried fish in the background for...
Page 95 - Xinevah of old, Thebes with its hundred gates, and Persepolis, were but baby-houses. 'Not another dwelling was there in the whole country, and this wretched contrivance had only been put up wit'hin the last four weeks. Having secured our horses, we entered the grand and principal entrance to the city, against the top of which my head got a severe blow, it not being more than five feet high from the ground. The room was lumbered up with barrels, boxes and all manner of things. Amongst other things...
Page 96 - Whilst we were at this repast, the thunder-storm broke over us, and a deluge of rain came down, streaming through the roof in various places. In the midst of the confusion two other vagabonds came in ; one of them a ruffian-looking fellow, who said he was a miner, on his way across the Indian country from Milwaukee : the other, a stupid, boorish, dirty-looking animal, said he had not tasted...
Page 88 - Turn where we would, every object within the ample range concurred to cherish and to establish more indelibly the pleasing impression caused by the whole; whilst the softness of these attractions contrasted here and there so strikingly with the noble rock escarpments peering out from the bluffs, that Nature might be said to speak to you in a voice that must be listened to, and to tell you that she had here surpassed the most polished efforts of English park scenery, the most difficult of all her...
Page 84 - In the course of the night he evaporated, and so ended the affair ; for as to apprehending him a second time, few persons would be found to attempt that, it being universally known that when frontier bloods of his calibre once imbrue their hands in blood, they entertain no scruples about taking the lives of those who come with hostile intentions against them. May 28. — Having finished our investigations in the course of the day, I began to pack up my fossils and minerals, preparatory to an excursion...
Page 229 - Upon the whole it was a picturesque sight, and brought to my recollection the descriptions of the condottieri of ancient times. Having engaged the stage to take us to Red Clay, we left Spring Place at 8 AM, passing for twenty-five miles through a wild country with a rolling surface, pleasingly wooded, and sufficiently open to admit of the growth of various beautiful flowers. We crossed the Connesawga, which is a beautiful mountain stream, and were frequently gratified with the sight of fine fat deer...
Page 95 - Why, then," exclaimed my alarmed companion, "what's to be done?" "I calculate I've got some salt pork," rejoined our little hostess. " Then, Madam, you must fry it without the fish," I replied. So to the old business we went, of bolting square pieces of fat pork, an amusement I had so often indulged in, that I sometimes felt as if I ought to be ashamed to look a live pig in the face.
Page 88 - The aspect of this lovely country at once accounted for so great a population flocking to the lakes, on whose enchanting banks those cities were founded of which we had heard so much, and to which we were now advancing. Four noble lakes in the centre of a region of such unrivalled beauty must constitute perfection itself. Our expectations were exceedingly raised ; every moment produced a new excitement ; the occasional glimpse of the shy deer, with their elegant fawns, and the more frequent flushing...
Page 329 - ... where it was necessary for him to keep a good character. Bechler's maxim was that honesty is the best policy ; and that maxim appeared to govern his conduct. I never was so pleased with observing transactions of business as those I saw at his house during the time I was there. Several country people came with rough gold to be left for coinage. He weighed it before them and entered it in his book, where there was marginal room for noting the subsequent assay. To others he delivered the coin he...
Page 328 - After breakfast I walked a few miles to visit a German of the name of Bechler, who issued a gold coinage of which I had seen several pieces. He received me very civilly, and I passed a great part of the day with him at his cottage in the woods. Bechler emigrated with a very clever young man, his son, from the Grand Duchy of Baden, where he had been a gunmaker and goldsmith of some reputation, and had acquired a considerable knowledge in the management of metals. He had resided seven years in this...

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