A Catalogue of Sanskrit Manuscripts in the Library of the Deccan College, with an Index: Old Collection

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Deccan College, 1884 - Manuscripts, Sanskrit - 61 pages
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Page 15 - Vrittis or comments on nine of the Angas of the Jainas. A long story is related as to how he was led to compose these commentaries. He had been afflicted with an incurable disease that rendered him unfit for any work of the kind ; but a certain deity appeared to him in a dream and directed him to go to Stambhanakapura (Cambay) where there was an image of ParsVanatha. He went there, bowed down before the image, and composed while standing the Namaskaradvatrim^ikS- or "thirty-two bows,
Page 2 - the commentary Dipika contains at the end of each canto a stanza in which the author gives his name as Narahari and states that he was the son of one Svayambhu, whose feet were incessantly adored by the king of Trilinga...
Page 2 - It consists of a hundred and one verses, some of them in the Prakrit, in each of which a certain person is represented to be doing a certain thing in a certain condition, and the reason why he or she does so, or the inner sense of the verse, is meant' to be found out by the reader.
Page 2 - Naishadhiya also contains at the end of each canto a stanza in which the author gives his name as Narahari and states that he was the son of one Svayambhu "whose feet were incessantly adored by the king of Trilihga...
Page 103 - SIR, — I have the honour to submit a report of the work done in the several service-; under the supervision of this office during the fourteen months ending on the 31st December, 1898.
Page 16 - Jainism äs well äs to his particular sect. He wrote the Ganadhara-saptati for exorcising a man possesed by a ghost and also a Caccari on the precepts engraved by Jinavallabha on the walls of certain temples. He once went to Naravara and thence to Tribhuvanagiri where he preached the truth to king Kumärapäla, Bhänd.
Page 5 - Ma8dhvCa.rme9 whic]l our soul is conscious, all feeling, even the ser.se of individuality and the external world, arise from the development of a certain principle which consists of ignorance and which represents the soul as otherwise than what it really is and generates mere appearances. When this principle is got rid of, the soul is free from all limitations and the appearances are dissolved, and being free from all misery, it resumes its pristine condition. This doctrine is condemned in unqualified...
Page 16 - Sr&vakas of the place the king granted a site for Jaina temples, and on a second visit Jinadatta laid the foundation stones. He made many converts to Jainism as well as to his particular sect. He wrote the Ganadharasaptati for exorcising a man possessed by a ghost and also a Chachchari on the precepts engraved by Jinavallabha on the walls of certain temples.
Page 5 - High-priests of the , v , ,. -,- r g^ta regular list of his successors to the present day together with the dates of their death. Copies of the list however found in the possession of different persons differ from each other in a few respects. It appears that in the older lists the year of the cycle of sixty years in which each High-priest died was alone given, and from this was determined the Saka year. But this method is uncertain and liable to error if in any case the pontificate of any one of...
Page 9 - ... substantially improved lunar theory; book 6 deals with eclipses; and books 7 and 8 catalog the stars. The final books, 9 to 13, contain Ptolemy's theory of planetary motion. Ptolemy's explanatory mechanism for all of these models is a system of circles known as epicycles, which were meant to predict the positions of the Sun, Moon, and planets at any given time. In the chapters on planetary motion, Ptolemy introduced the concept of uniform planetary motion around a point eccentric to the Earth,...

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