A Catalogue of the Ashmolean Museum: Descriptive of the Zoological Specimens, Antiquities, Coins and Miscelleaneous Curiosities

Front Cover
S. Collingwood., 1836 - Antiquities - 188 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page vii - As by their choice collections may appear, Of what is rare, in land, in sea, in air ; Whilst they (as Homer's Iliad in a nut) A world of wonders in one closet shut : These famous Antiquarians, that had been Both gardeners to the Rose and...
Page 1 - Theology ; to induce a mental habit of associating the view of natural phenomena with the conviction that they are the media of Divine manifestation ; and, by such association, to give proper dignity to every branch of natural science.
Page vii - As by their choice collections may appear Of what is rare in Land, in Sea, in Air, Whilst they (as Homer's Iliad in a nut) A world of wonders in one closet shut. These famous Antiquarians that had been Both gardeners to the Rose and Lily Queen...
Page 94 - ... skeleton, giving form and protection to the entire fabric. The material of which the fleshy portion is composed is of so tender and gelatinous a nature that the slightest pressure is sufficient to tear it asunder, and allow the fluid parts to escape ; and the whole soon melts away into a thin oily liquid. When examined with the microscope, the soft flesh is seen to contain a great number of minute grains, disseminated through a transparent jelly. Every part of the surface of a living sponge (as...
Page viii - Happily, at this time, a taste for the study of natural history had been excited in the University by Dr. Paley's very interesting work on natural theology, and the very popular lectures of Dr. Kidd on comparative anatomy, and Dr. Buckland on geology. * Availing himself of this spirit, the curator induced the trustees to sanction a general repair of the Museum. Their wish was seconded by the liberality of the vice-chancellor and convocation. " When the room had been cleansed, repaired, and put in...
Page 139 - ... probably (says Dr Musgrave) a dolphin, or perhaps a griffin, the national emblem of the Saxons, having in its mouth a small tube, traversed by a strong rivet, to which a chain was doubtlessly attached ; on the reverse of the gem, the lower jaw is wanting, and its place is supplied by a scaly flat surface. As to the use to which this piece of jewelry was appropriated, opinion has been divided. Dr Hickes, Dr Musgrave, and the late Mr Whitaker, imagined that it must have been worn on the breast...
Page 141 - ... gigantic stature lay buried, and that over his breast and back were plates of pure gold, and on his fingers rings of gold so large, that an ordinary man might creep through them.
Page viii - Happily at this time [1824] a taste for the study of natural history had been excited in the University by Dr Paley's very interesting work on Natural Theology, and the very popular lectures of Dr Kidd on Comparative Anatomy, and Dr Buckland on Geology." In the arrangement of the contents of the Museum the illustration of Paley's work was given the foremost place by JS Duncan : " The first division proposes to familiarize the eye to those relations of all natural objects which form the basis of argument...
Page iv - Museum was suggested by the will of Sir Hans Sloane, who, during a long period of eminent practice in physic, had accumulated, in addition to a...
Page 17 - Lin.); distinguished by their crooked beak and claws, by means of which they are enabled to overcome and prey upon other birds, and even the weaker quadrupeds. They hold the same rank among birds as the carnivora among quadrupeds. They all have four toes, and the nails of the great and middle toes are the strongest They form two families, the DIURNAL and NOCTURNAL : the first having nostrils inserted in a naked cere, three toes before and one behind, without feathers ; eyes directed sideways: the...

Bibliographic information