A Catalogue of the Fishes of Greece, with Notes on the Names Now in Use and Those Employed by Classical Authors

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Academy of Natural Sciences, 1892 - Fishes - 56 pages
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Page 230 - Grece: par Nicolas Chr. Apostolides). This work contains numerous vernacular names and it has been largely drawn upon in the present paper. In this paper is printed a systematic list of the fishes known from Greece, either on the authority of Apostolides or from my own collection, with the vernacular names and such notes on them as I am able to offer. No one can be more fully aware than I am, of the unsatisfactory character of many things in this paper. It was often difficult or impossible to make...
Page 276 - It leads a solitary life, is the only fish which has its heart in its belly, has stones in its brain like millstones in form, and is the only fish which lies torpid in the warmest days under the reign of the dog star, Sirius, the other fishes going into this torpid state in the wintriest days.
Page 277 - ... only fish which has its heart in its belly, has stones in its brain like millstones in form, and is the only fish which lies torpid in the warmest days under the reign of the dog star, Sirius, the other fishes going into this torpid state in the wintriest days. The...
Page 274 - Aristotle, 1531a 20, 508b 17, 593a 7. 598a 14. It has many pyloric appendages, breeds (spawns) twice a year, alternates between the open sea and the shallow water along the shore; the axop-'dsc breed in the open sea (TU -/.ufoc).
Page 275 - The white •,..•,••'/,'>.•, found in the Euripus of Lesbos, never leaves that lagoon for the open sea as the other fishes found there do. Latin Gobio and Cobio, Plin.
Page 275 - The xoj/SioS has many pyloric appendages above the stomach, spawns near the land on the rocks, the bunches of eggs are flat and crumbling; it feeds on mud, seaweed, sea moss, etc.
Page 274 - Aristotle mentions axopmot and axopxiSsc in different places. It is not clear whether he means the same fish by these two names. That we have frequently eaten both axоp-atva and axopxип and that the flavors and colors are different, no one is ignorant. Archestratus, in his " Golden Words," says : " Buy the small axop-ioc, but beware of a big one.
Page 250 - The word was used by the poets as the name of a sea monster, half horse and half fish, on which the sea gods rode. As the name of a fish it seems to occur only in late writings. Its stomach was regarded as a poison of peculiar power and also as possessing medicinal and magic powers. See Menand. Incert.
Page 230 - The first-named author of the present paper spent a large part of the spring and summer of 1890 in Greece. Part of this time was devoted to making collections of the fishes found in the markets of Athens and to the study of the vernacular names now applied by the Greek fishermen to these fishes. Each fish as obtained was preserved in alcohol, a number attached to it, and a record kept of the vernacular name attached to this number.
Page 247 - Systc) are in other respects similar in form to the land serpents, but they have the head more congershaped ; there are many kinds of the sea serpents, and they have every sort of color. They are not found in very deep places. In the second reference Aristotle seems partly to contradict the above, saying, the sea serpent's color and body are similar to those of the j-oj7Y,o?

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