A Century of Foxhunting with the Warwickshire Hounds: Being a Sketch History of the Hunt from 1791 to 1891

Front Cover
J. Potts, 1891 - Fox hunting - 206 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 37 - Making desp'rate play thro' some fine muddy lanes, And by nicking and skirting, got in for his pains ; High waving the brush, and with pleasure half mad, Roaring out...
Page 90 - Lordship has had such fine sport these two last seasons. It may be said they cannot be given to a better man — which I readily agree to ; but what is become of the Meriden country — the finest woodland country in the world — the country that, when Mr. Corbet hunted Warwickshire, produced such sport — such real sport to real lovers of fox-hunting ? I answer, it is gone ! The Warwickshire woodlands are now termed the " Kenilworth country," which may be said to be a bad exchange.
Page 14 - I was doom'd to bear : How oft I have enjoyed the noble chase Of hounds and foxes, each striving for the race ! But the knell of Death calls me away; So, sportsmen, farewell ! — I must obey.
Page 33 - Speed, Let them Jostle and Cross, for a Start or a Lead, Upon Selling their Nags, more than Hunting, intent. And scarce knowing the Meaning, of what is called Scent ; All declaiming at once, such a Shout, such a Yell, Doing only, what Monkeys might do just as well; Where Sport depends quite, upon knowing the Cover, And the very best Run, in an Half-hour is over ; May such Hunting as this, never fall to my Lot, Let them race, if they like it, I envy them not ; The Blood of old TROJAN is all I desire,...
Page 6 - In consequence of this the duke altered the fixture, and on the first time of Mr. Warde meeting at this said covert, the duke, and his friends who were staying with him at Woburn, attended at the fixture, when Mr. Warde rode up to His Grace, and taking off his hat, out of respect to the duke, said, " My Lord Duke — I am extremely sorry that my duty as the present occupier of this country compelled me to establish my right to draw this covert : having done so, I now concede it to your Grace, so...
Page 3 - Here Hoitt, all his sports and labours past, Joins his loved master, Somervile, at last : Together went they echoing fields to try, Together now in silent dust they lie. Servant and Lord, when once we yield our breath, Huntsman and poet are alike in death. Life's motley drama calls for powers and men Of different casts to fill...
Page 31 - Foes he determined to face, And again took them off, at a rare splitting Pace ; O'er a strong and stiff Country, went forward in Style, With the Hounds at his Brush, in full View for a Mile : Was next seen in a Bottom, and there headed Back, And whilst climbing the Steep, fell a Prey to the Pack. The BURST...
Page 32 - ... fled to some Furze, remained dodging about, Till Wanton at length, forced the Vagabond out. Thus routed, his Foes he determined to face, And again took them off, at a rare splitting Pace ; O'er a strong and stiff Country, went forward in Style, With the Hounds at his Brush, in full View for a Mile : Was next seen in a Bottom, and there headed Back, And whilst climbing the Steep, fell a Prey to the Pack. The BURST — perhaps MELTON will smile, when he reads — Was so quick, that it took something...
Page 14 - Barrow was the only servant he ever had or knew, fit to trust with his own horses' mouths (that is, the horses he himself rode), having so gentle and good a hand on his bridle.
Page 32 - Wimberton making most desperate play. Now headed, and forc'd his first point to decline, To Epwell push'd forward as straight as a line ; Finding there nothing left for his life but to run, He resolv'd to die game, and to shew them some fun : So thro...

Bibliographic information