A Cigarette-maker's Romance, Volume 2

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Macmillan and Company, 1890 - American fiction - 265 pages
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Page 139 - It is of no use to ring," he said, quietly. "I have given it up." "Herr Schmidt!" exclaimed the girl in evident delight. It was Vjera. "Yes — but, in Heaven's name, Vjera, what are you doing here at this hour of the night? You ought to be at home and asleep. " "Oh, you have not heard the dreadful news," cried poor Vjera in accents of distress. " Oh, if we cannot get in here, come with me, for the love of Heaven, and help me to get him out of that horrible place — oh, if you only knew what has...
Page 159 - They move slowly at first, biting still, here and there, at the bunches of rich moss. Presently the slow step becomes a trot, they crowd closely together while the Laps hasten to gather up their last unpacked possessions, their cooking utensils and their wooden gods. The great herd break together from a trot to a gallop, from a gallop to a break-neck race, the distant thunder of their united tread reaches the camp during a few minutes, and they are gone to drink of the polar sea. The Laps follow...
Page 158 - They grow unruly, and it is hard to harness them in the light sledge. As the days pass, the Laps watch them more and more closely, well knowing what will happen sooner or later. And then at last, in the northern twilight, the great herd begins to move. The impulse is simultaneous, irresistible, their heads are all turned in one direction. They move slowly at first, biting still, here and there, at the bunches of rich moss. Presently the slow step becomes a trot, they crowd closely together, while...
Page 1 - ... room of a tobacconist's shop is not perhaps the spot which a writer of fiction would naturally choose as the theatre of his play, nor does the inventor of pleasant romances, of stirring incident, or moving love-tales feel himself instinctively inclined to turn to Munich as to the city of his dreams. On the other hand, it is by no means certain that, if the choice of a stage for our performance were offered to the most contented among us, we should be satisfied to speak our parts and go through...
Page 160 - Ever swifter and more terrible in their motion, the ruthless herd has raced onward, careless of the slain, careless of food, careless of any drink but the sharp salt water ahead of them. And when at last the Laplanders reach the shore their deer are once more quietly grazing, once more tame and docile, once more ready to drag the sledge whithersoever they are guided. Once in his life the reindeer must taste of the sea in one long, satisfying draught, and if he is hindered he perishes. Neither man...
Page 292 - PIETRO GHISLERI. DON ORSINO. A sequel to " Saracinesca " and " Sant ' Ilario." THE THREE FATES. THE WITCH OF PRAGUE. KHALED. A CIGARETTE-MAKER'S ROMANCE. SANT' ILARIO. A sequel to
Page 220 - Now, if you only stayed here for a little while," said the captain, persuasively, " say a couple of years, no doubt things would right themselves. Anything might happen in two years. Mind, it's not your father's idea, it's mine. I'd do anything for him ; he has done me many a good turn in his time, and I want to pay him back." Miss Hartley, softening somewhat, thanked him. " And what is two years at your time of life ? " continued the captain, brightly. " Nothing. Why, I'm going away for that time...
Page 159 - Lapps follow after them, dragging painfully their laden sledges in the broad track left by the thousands of galloping beasts. A day's journey, and they are yet far from the sea, and the trail is yet broad. On the second day it grows narrower, and there are stains of blood to be seen ; far on the distant plain before them their sharp eyes distinguish in the direct line a dark, motionless object — another, and then another. The race has grown more desperate and more wild as the stampede neared the...
Page 136 - Munich, which he has described in a few incidental phrases, proceeds to elaborate a picture of very different surroundings, apparently no less familiar to his eye: The Cossack thought, as he often thought when alone in the night, of his long journeys on horseback, driving great flocks of bleating sheep over endless steppes and wolds, and expanses of pasture and meadow; he remembered the reddening of the sheep's woolly coats in the evening sun, the quick change from gold to...
Page 158 - ... things were gone for ever, arose the great longing for one more breath of liberty, for one more ride over the boundless steppe, for one more draught of the sour kvass, of the camp brew of rye and malt. The longing for such things, for one thing almost unattainable, is in man and beast at certain times. In the distant northern plains, a hundred miles from the sea, in the midst of the Laplander's village, a young reindeer raises his broad muzzle to the north wind, and stares at the limitless distance...

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