A class-book of physical geography

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Page 142 - The Sun came up upon the left, Out of the sea came he! And he shone bright, and on the right Went down into the sea. Higher and higher every day, Till over the mast at noon — ' The Wedding-Guest here beat his breast.
Page 142 - All in a hot and copper sky, The bloody Sun, at noon, Right up above the mast did stand, No bigger than the Moon. Day after day, day after day, We stuck, nor breath nor motion; As idle as a painted ship Upon a painted ocean.
Page 157 - Sea-Breezes do blow in the Day and rest in the Night ; so on the contrary, these do blow in the Night and rest in the Day, and so they do alternately succeed each other. For when the...
Page 157 - ... gradually withdraws its force till all is spent ; and about five o'clock, sooner or later, according as the weather is, it is lulled asleep, and comes no more till the next morning. These winds are as constantly expected as the day in their proper latitudes, and seldom fail but in the wet season.
Page 236 - ... after this the calcareous sand lies undisturbed, and offers to the seeds of trees and plants cast upon it by the waves, a soil upon which they rapidly grow to overshadow its dazzling white surface. Entire trunks of trees, which are carried by the rivers from other countries and islands, find here, at length, a...
Page 157 - They both come and go away again earlier or later, according to the weather, the season of the year, or some accidental cause from the land. For, on some coasts, they do rise earlier, blow fresher, and remain later than on other coasts, as I shall show hereafter. These winds blow off to sea, a greater or less distance, according as the coast lies more or less exposed to the...
Page 50 - ... origin or fountain is in the ramifications of the higher valleys and gorges, which descend amongst the mountains perpetually snow-clad. But what gives to a glacier its most peculiar and characteristic feature is, that it does not belong exclusively or necessarily to the snowy region already mentioned.
Page 156 - These sea-breezes do commonly rise in the morning about nine o'clock, sometimes sooner, sometimes later ; they first approach the shore so gently, as if they were afraid to come near it, and ofttimes they make some faint breathings, and, as if not willing to offend, they make a halt, and seem ready to retire. I have waited many a time, both ashore to receive the pleasure, and at sea to take the benefit of it. It comes in a fine small black curl upon the water...
Page 51 - A GLACIER is AN IMPERFECT FLUID, OR A VISCOUS BODY. WHICH IS URGED DOWN SLOPES OF A CERTAIN INCLINATION BY THE MUTUAL PRESSURE OF ITS PARTS.
Page 218 - The crater was five miles in circumference, and about a thousand paces deep ; its sides were covered with brushwood, and at the bottom there was a plain on which cattle grazed. In the woody parts wild boars frequently harboured.

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