A Clinical Treatise on Diseases of the Liver, Volume 1

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William Wood, 1879 - Biliary tract
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Page 142 - Frank), to catarrh of the duodenum and of the bile ducts, to spasm of the ducts, polycholia, &c.; but in most of the cases, the supposition of the existence of such exciting causes is justified as little by the symptoms during life, as by the post-mortem appearances. The mode of production of icterus neonatorum in ordinary cases, must be sought for in the diminished tension of the capillaries in the hepatic tissue, which takes place upon the stoppage of the influx of blood from the umbilical vein,...
Page ix - ... which are naturally voided in the urine. When, however, anything interferes with these normal metamorphoses in the blood, as when this fluid becomes contaminated by the purulent infection, or by any other poison, it is supposed that the complete metamorphosis of the colorless bile into urinary pigment is arrested, and that the intermediate substance, bile-pigment, is formed in the blood, so as to color the various tissues and secretions. The arrested metamorphosis of the biliary acids, under...
Page 1 - This organ and the portal venous system attracted at a very early period the attention of physicians. More from vague conjectures than upon clearly established grounds, the seat of various functions, of great importance both in health and disease, was transferred to this powerful glandular organ, and to the extensive system of vessels, which is intimately connected with the gastro-intestinal canal. By the ancients the liver was regarded as the central organ of vegetative life.
Page 209 - Lereboullet * ob served, that on feeding geese with maize, the relative weight of the liver in proportion to that of the...
Page 89 - ... resulting from the stoppage of bile: such consequences as anaemia, dropsy, cholaemia, &c. The derangement of the functions of the bowels, which manifest themselves principally in the form of obstinate constipation and complaints of flatulence, may be greatly lessened by means of an appropriate choice of diet, by restriction to easily-digested lean meat and vegetable food, and by avoiding all fatty articles and such as are wont to occasion flatulence. The sluggish condition of the bowels is best...
Page 81 - Retardation of the heart? & action. Very commonly the frequency of the heart's contraction in jaundice falls to a greater or less extent below the normal standard, in most cases to 50 or 40 beats, and now and then to still fewer; in one case I have counted 28 beats, and in another only 21. This retardation, which not unfrequently is accompanied by irregular rhythm of the heart's action, often lasts for several weeks before it disappears; it ceases immediately, when inflammatory or other acute processes...
Page 1 - Galen looked upon it as the focus of animal heat, and as the organ intended for the formation of blood, and for the origin of the veins.
Page iii - Steam Reserve, the torpedo boats, and armed merchant steamers. It will be observed that the crews are in each case practically complete, and there can be no doubt that a great advance has been made towards the speedy manning of the Fleet in case of sudden necessity.
Page 88 - When these are removed, there is seldom any necessity for further treatment directed against the jaundice itself. As might be expected, the means to be employed for accomplishing these indications for treatment, vary greatly according to the nature of the primary causes of the disease ; they will subsequently occupy our attention, when we come to treat of the individual forms of jaundice and of the corresponding affections of the liver and of the bile ducts. Not unfrequently, the cause of the jaundice...
Page 60 - Many pathologists, however, adopt the second theory. 2. The second theory is, that under morbid conditions of the system, substances are formed in the blood without the co-operation of the liver, which in color and other properties resemble the ingredients of bile, if they are not identical with them; but which only assume a pathological importance from their quantity being in excess. This view as to the formation of bile, if we except obscure hints at it, already existing in the writings of Galen...

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