A Collection and Abridgement of Celebrated Criminal Trials in Scotland: From A. D. 1536 to 1784. With Historical and Critical Remarks

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Hugo Arnot
A. Napier, 1812 - Judgments, Criminal - 440 pages
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Page 408 - Therefore rejoice, ye heavens, and ye that dwell in them. Woe to the inhabiters of the earth and of the sea! for the devil is come, down unto you, having great wrath, because he knoweth that he hath but a short time.
Page 135 - But this we must refer to the ensuing book of these commentaries: only observing for the present, that it is the most transcendent privilege which any subject can enjoy, or wish for, that he cannot be affected either in his property, his liberty, or his person, but by the unanimous consent of twelve of his neighbours and equals.
Page 136 - ... is the most transcendent privilege which any subject can enjoy or wish for, that he cannot be affected either in his property, his liberty, or his person, but by the unanimous consent of twelve of his neighbours and equals. A constitution that I may venture to affirm, has, under Providence, secured the just liberties of this nation for a long succession of ages.
Page 251 - My Lords, I tamely submit to my hard sentence. I forgive the jury, and the witnesses, who have sworn several things falsely against me ; and I declare before the great God, and this auditory, that I had no previous knowledge of the murder of Colin Campbell, of Glenure, and am as innocent of it as a child unborn. I am not afraid to die ; but what grieves me, is my character, that after ages should think me capable of such a horrid and barbarous murder.
Page 221 - May last, when he was riding about a gun-shot behind his master in the wood of Lettermore, he heard a shot, which he took to be the report of a musket. It neither alarmed him nor did he know whence it came ; but, when he came up he saw the preceding witness wringing his hands, and his master lying on the ground with a great deal of blood about him, just breathing, and not able to speak. The deponent was desired by the preceding witness to go in quest of Mr. Campbell, of Ballieveolan, and his sons,...
Page 251 - If you had been successful in that rebellion, you might have been giving the law where you have now received the judgment of it; we, who are this day your judges, might have been tried before one of your mock courts of judicature; and then you might have been satiated with the blood of any name or clan to which you had an aversion.
Page 246 - ... place, lest he should bring the deponent and his family to trouble. " That Allan Breck said he did not doubt but that the family of Ardshiel would be suspected of the murder, and it was probable the pannel and Allan Stewart, his son, might be taken into custody about it; and that he, Allan Breck, was afraid Allan Stewart, the pannel's son's tongue was not so good as his father's, by which words the deponent understood that Allan was easier intrapped than the pannel.
Page 228 - ... concern in it, but believed he should be suspected ; and on this account, and being a deserter, it was necessary for him to leave the kingdom : and therefore, as he was very scarce of money, he requested the deponent to go to the prisoner, and acquaint him, that he, Allan Breck, was gone to Coalisnacoan, and desire him, if possible, to send him money there. The deponent promised to deliver the message, and did deliver it to the prisoner, who, without saying whether he was to send the money or...
Page 342 - She went to the place of execution dressed in a black robe and petticoat, •with a large hoop, a white fan in her hand, and a white sarsnet hood on her head, according to the fashion of the times. When she came upon the scaffold, she put off the ornamental...
Page 136 - So that the liberties of England cannot but subsist so long as this palladium remains sacred and inviolate, not only from all open attacks (which none will be so hardy as to make), but also from all secret machinations which may sap and undermine it...

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