A collection of Gaelic proverbs and familiar phrases: based on Macintosh's collection

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Maclachlan and Stewart, 1882 - Proverbs, Scottish Gaelic - 421 pages
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Page 243 - To have done, is to hang Quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail In monumental mockery. Take the instant way For honour travels in a strait so narrow, W'here one but goes abreast: keep then the path; For emulation hath a thousand sons, That one by one pursue: If you give way, Or hedge aside from the direct forthright, Like to an enter'd tide, they all rush by, And leave you hindmost...
Page 201 - I'll tell you, friend! a wise man and a fool. You'll find, if once the monarch acts the monk, Or, cobbler-like, the parson will be drunk, Worth makes the man, and want of it, the fellow; The rest is all but leather or prunella.
Page 213 - Words are like leaves; and where they most abound, Much fruit of sense beneath is rarely found.
Page 155 - A whip for the horse, a bridle for the ass, and a rod for the fool's back.
Page 115 - No, no, my friend," said he ; " it is not to be expected that any man in Mull, who has got it, will part with it. Consider, Sir, the value of such a piece of timber here!
Page 18 - He that ruleth his spirit, is better than he that taketh a city,
Page 31 - It shall be the duty of every parent to provide elementary education in reading, writing, and arithmetic for his children between five and thirteen years of age, and if unable from poverty to pay therefor, to apply to the parochial board of the parish or burgh in which he resides, and it shall be the duty of...
Page 63 - Why do those cliffs of shadowy tint appear More sweet than all the landscape smiling near ?— 'Tis distance lends enchantment to the view, And robes the mountain in its azure hue.
Page 85 - Sleep no more! Macbeth does murder sleep," the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast, — Lady M. What do you mean? Macb. Still it cried, "Sleep no more!
Page 75 - Hast thou found honey ? eat so much as is sufficient for thee, lest thou be filled therewith, and vomit it. 17 Withdraw thy foot from thy neighbour's house; lest he be weary of thee, and so hate thee.

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