A Collection of Etchings, from the Most Celebrated Ancient and Modern Productions in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture, of the Italian and French Schools: From Originals Preserved in the Louvre, Paris, with Descriptions from the French of C.P. Landon

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W.T. Gilling, 1821 - Etching - 150 pages
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Page 83 - BLEST as th' immortal Gods is he , The youth who fondly sits by thee, And hears and sees thee all the while Softly speak , and sweetly smile. • 'Twas this deprived my soul of rest , And rais'd such tumults in my breast; For while I gaz'd, in transport lost, My breath was gone , my voice was lost. My bosom glow'd , the subtle flame Ran quick thro' all my vital frame; O'er my dim eyes a darkness hung , My ears with hollow murmurf rung.
Page 84 - O'er my dim eyes a darkness hung ; My ears with hollow murmurs rung. In dewy damps my limbs were chill'd ; My blood with gentle horrors thrill'd ; My feeble pulse forgot to play ; I fainted, sunk, and died away.
Page 71 - And when they continued asking Him, He lifted up Himself and said to them : He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her. And again He stooped down, and wrote on the ground.
Page 71 - When therefore they continued asking him, he lifted up himself, and said to them : He that is without sin among you, let him first cast a stone at her.
Page 71 - Pharisees bring unto him a woman taken in adultery: and they set her in the midst, 4 And said to him : Master, this woman was even now taken in adultery. 5 Now Moses in the law commanded us to stone such a one. But what sayest thou? 6 And this they said tempting him, that they might accuse him. But Jesus bowing himself down, wrote with his finger on the ground. 7 When therefore they continued asking him, he lifted up himself, and said to them: He that is without sin among you, let him first cast...
Page 2 - ... Persia, whom he put to flight —fled to the succour of Rome, besieged by Totila the Gothic king, and preserved the city from destruction : the saviour, in short, of the empire, whose name and achievements the people of Constantinople venerated and extolled : — This hero, worthy of a better fate, fell a victim to the jealousy of the great, or rather to the weakness of a mistrustful and cruel emperor. Reduced to the most deplorable condition, deprived of his sight, he presents, in the picture...
Page 87 - The bounds of this work will not permit us to enter into a minute examination of this chef-d'oeuvre of beauty.
Page 98 - Achilles, feeding him with the marrow of lions, bears, and tigers, and formed him for single combats. Chiron, who had likewise for his disciples Esculapius, Castor and Pollux, Hercules and Jason, may be regarded as one of the most ancient personages of Greece, having preceded the conquest of the Golden Fleece and the Trojan war. The ancients gave him the name of Centaur, attributing his particular form to the inhabitants of the marshes of Nephele and Thessaly, who were first acquainted with the art...

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